About Me

mindah pic 2Hi! I’m Mindah-Lee Kumar (but you can call me Mindah). I’m passionate about making the Buddha’s teachings easy to understand so you can apply it to your life and quickly experience its great benefits.

I’ve been practicing Buddhism for over ten years, and in that time I was ordained as a Buddhist nun for three years and I spent a total of three years in solitary meditation retreats.

Although the Buddha’s teachings are vast and extensive, I believe the teachings don’t need be complicated and that you can get results without spending years studying. As long as you understand the essence of the teachings and how to easily implement them, you can live a more Buddha-full life with more kindness, compassion, peace, happiness and wisdom starting today!

Having studied and practiced mostly in the Theravada and Vajrayana (Tibetan) Buddhist traditions, I prefer to teach across all traditions, as each of the different schools teach the same Buddhist philosophy but simply have different practice methods and techniques.

On this site, you’ll find plenty of free informative videos and guided meditations to help you get started in the basics. Then over on my Members’ Site you’ll find more in-depth teachings to take your understanding and practice to the next level. (You can sign up to my mailing list to be notified when the Members’ Site goes live.)

I hope you’ll join me in exploring the great treasure of the Buddha’s teachings, which brings peace & clarity to the mind and joy & compassion to one’s heart.

May all beings experience the peace and bliss that comes from attaining enlightenment!

Mindah Kumar

If you’re interested, you can read my full story here.

 

 

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224 Comments

  1. Red Zambala
    April 17, 2013 @ 4:49 am

    And here is my story:)

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      April 17, 2013 @ 5:25 am

      That’s amazing that your practice of mind training and meditation started in 5th grade!

      I like how you said “According to Buddha and me, everything is based on the 4 Noble Truths” 😉

      You have experienced an interesting array of traditions and practices. I have certainly found my ‘philosophical home’ in Buddhism too. Thanks for sharing!

      Reply

      • A shin nandathiri.
        March 30, 2014 @ 10:41 am

        today i find of your website, i read about you i m very like this website. so i want to introduce myself my name is nandathri and i m a Buddhist monk. nice to meet you. thank you.

        Reply

        • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
          March 30, 2014 @ 11:21 am

          Hi Nandathri. A pleasure to meet you. Which tradition do you practice Buddhism in?

          Reply

      • Jerry Blackwell
        January 13, 2016 @ 8:29 am

        Hello Mindah,

        I’m very glad that I discovered your Buddhist site & videos. I converted to Buddhism five years ago at the age of 63. While raised Catholic until my teenage years, I never practiced or was religious during my adult life. I do have a science background. I knew nothing about the Buddha until I read a short book on his teachings. I was shocked as I realized that I’ve always been a Buddhist and never know it. I decided to learn and keep close to the original Buddha’s words and therefore I have been learning and trying hard to live as a lay Theravada Buddhist.

        I find that your presentations of the Dharma are as I have learned them in my studies. I appreciate your ability and articulation, your English ability, and your charm and feminism. It does sound like you have lived a fortunate young life. Your husband is a very lucky man (I hope it is not bad to say that). I will watch all of your U-Tube videos, Facebook & Twitter postings and learn more about about the Noble One.

        Please continue your mission to teach about Buddhism and best of luck to you always.

        Thank You.

        Reply

  2. bhikkhu samahita
    April 28, 2013 @ 11:56 pm

    Friendship IS the Greatest!
    If glad-2-get Early Buddhist e-mails click join Google Group here:
    http://What-Buddha-Said.net/
    Have a nice, noble and easy day!
    Bhikkhu Samahita 🙂 _/\_

    Reply

  3. Daniel
    February 1, 2014 @ 8:54 pm

    Thanks for sharing your story…it’s always interesting to hear how we all come to the same path in so many different ways! I just stumbled across your video on The Four Noble Truths. I very much enjoyed your perspective and decided to explore further. I truly enjoy gaining perspective and knowledge from others, and I feel that your site will be another guiding hand on my journey. Thank you again for sharing! (*I’m very interested in an approach to sharing Buddhism as it applied to modern, Western society. “Hardcore Zen” by Brad Warren is an enlightening read! I’d love to get your thoughts on it some time!)

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      February 3, 2014 @ 8:59 pm

      Hi Daniel. Thanks for checking out my site and reading my story. I also enjoy hearing about other people’s entry into Buddhism and no matter how many times I’ve read about it or experienced it, I never get tired of hearing other people’s perspective on the Four Noble Truths. I hope I can share some enlightening things for you to watch/read on my website. When I finally get around to reading Brad’s book, I’ll let you know my thoughts. Generally, however, any teacher making the Dharma more understandable and available to Western minds is usually a good thing. 😉

      Reply

  4. Jack C
    February 4, 2014 @ 3:34 pm

    Hi and thank you for your enthusiasm! I stumbled across your site quite by accident. What really made me happy is that you are so young. I’m 61 yrs. old and have been hanging around the edges of Buddhism since I was in my 20’s. What I’ve noticed is that as I get older, the average age of those attending western Buddhist centers has grown too. In other words there aren’t enough young people joining the Sangha. I now live in Thailand and the same is true here – Buddhism is not as popular here as it was in the past. So thank you for sharing your enthusiasm it is sure to attract some much needed young blood!

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      February 4, 2014 @ 10:53 pm

      Hi Jack,

      I have also seen a greater interest in Buddhism from people aged 40+. But fortunately I was lucky to find a few people my own age at my local centre. I’m sure age comes in to play mostly because younger people are still chasing after the happiness (albeit ephemeral) that is promised to us by society. I just exhausted my ‘happiness list’ a lot sooner than most I suspect and hence why I came to the Dharma earlier. I am very excited to spread the profound message of the Dharma, and hopefully open the eyes of some of the younger ones as well.

      Thanks for your comments and encouragement. 🙂

      Reply

  5. Nishant K
    February 22, 2014 @ 4:28 pm

    I was searching for ‘six realms’ and ‘monkey mind meditation’ and i came across your website link on YouTube. Almost all collection of things i was searching for is here. 🙂

    Its difficult to find all concepts of buddhism at one place with videos. Great Job.. 😀 I’m not buddhist but i like researching on various religions and foundations. I’m not sure what i was exactly searching for till now, lots of random thoughts keep appearing out of nowhere, but many of my questions got answered here. I’ve researched up on various medical topics, clinical hypnosis, neural networks both medical and computer just trying figure out the mystery of brain. But it’s the mind i was looking for.

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      February 23, 2014 @ 12:13 am

      Hi Nishant. Discovering our mind and its potential to achieve happiness and something good in this world is a great discovery. I’m glad my videos could answer many of your questions. 🙂

      Reply

  6. Jithin Divakar
    March 1, 2014 @ 1:43 pm

    Your voice is so soothing and sublime. To calm down after a busy day’s work I either listen to yourself, Mingyur Rinpoche, Richard Wagner or Mozart. As a former resident of Surfers Paradise, I can somehow relate to parts of your story.

    Thank you so much.

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      March 1, 2014 @ 9:34 pm

      Wow, that is quite some compliment! Thanks. I do hope you find a soothing panacea in the practice of meditation and the Buddha’s teachings as well. 😉 These have been the most soothing balm for all my ailments. 🙂

      Reply

  7. Daniel
    March 9, 2014 @ 6:58 pm

    Hi Mindah, I’ve watched several of your videos now and, similar to a previous poster, feel blessed to have found this website and choose to interpret it as a good sign I’m on the right path to being a better person (so thank you!). I read your ‘about me’ section and felt as though I wrote it myself, particularly your description of having a good life yet being consistently unhappy underneath it all. I believe incorporating a consistent meditation practice into my life (with the aid of your videos and calm presence) will be a turning point for learning to appreciate life again, as it has sadly been diminished over the years (for various reasons, not least of which is anger, stress, and lack of patience with life in general). Thank you so much for sharing these videos and steering me back onto the right path; I was trying to find my way the last few months, but now I feel I have a navigator in the passenger seat helping me along! I look forward to growing alongside your videos. Thank you again.

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      March 10, 2014 @ 4:20 am

      Lovely! Thanks Daniel. It’s great to be travelling this path along with you. I’m really pleased to hear that you’re going to start a regular meditation practice. I hope that your practice and my small contributions will provide all the ingredients you need to get back to living a life of presence, happiness and inspiration. 🙂

      Reply

  8. Teri Hogan
    March 17, 2014 @ 3:52 pm

    Thank you Mindah for sharing your story. A friend shared one
    of your videos with me this morning and I’ve been watching
    other video’s for an hour now. I would love to see a talk
    on attachment. My son is going through a very difficult time and even though I believed I had let him go to walk his path,
    I have gotten caught up in his troubles,creating great suffering for myself. I am working to create mindfulness again and practicing The Four Great Efforts. Would love to hear you talk about attachment.
    Thank you!

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      March 18, 2014 @ 3:52 am

      Hi Teri, hopefully this is a video I can make in the near future. I have a pretty long list I’m trying to work through at the moment. I hope your son’s situation has resolved itself by the time I make the video. In the meantime, your own practice of mindfulness and the Four Great Efforts will definitely assist you. If you can spend more time meditating on compassion and impermanence this would also help. Best wishes.

      Reply

  9. Teri Hogan
    March 18, 2014 @ 2:55 pm

    Thank you.

    Reply

  10. brenndon
    March 30, 2014 @ 9:40 pm

    Hi, as a new student, i find that you make the topics you talk about on your youtube videos very easy to understand. they help me make sense of how to apply the teachings to my everyday experience so far. i like the way that you make it relatable and very accessible. thank you and hope to see more videos in the future.

    Reply

  11. neetu
    April 29, 2014 @ 5:05 pm

    found yr you tube video through g+ post nd then yr website.
    very informative.love reading yr articles.yr work inspires.i am practicings mindfullness.you have lord buddhas blessings vd you,may he shower more nd more love on you.

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      April 30, 2014 @ 12:09 am

      Thanks Neetu. I’m glad my work inspires you. Thanks for your lovely wishes. 🙂

      Reply

      • sam
        February 17, 2016 @ 2:38 am

        can you please tell me how Buddha comes into effect with my Christianity I am a spiritual being aware and awakened though I am wondering if I wear the Buddha and take it off and decide I rather have it in my pocket or at my desk if that is ok and useful as well I am just new to this whole thing as far as Buddha

        Reply

        • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
          February 22, 2016 @ 7:12 am

          Hi Sam,

          A Buddha pendant should be used to help us cultivate spiritual qualities like patience and compassion, so generally it’s fine to place it anywhere where you can become aware of it and be reminded by it. It’s best to keep it in a clean place, but otherwise there aren’t so many rules (especially if you’re not a formal Buddhist and haven’t participated in a refuge ceremony).

          Reply

  12. Humberto
    May 4, 2014 @ 11:09 pm

    Thanks

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      May 5, 2014 @ 12:06 am

      You’re welcome. 🙂

      Reply

      • Raman
        December 1, 2016 @ 2:54 pm

        Dear Ma’am
        I am from INDIA, I am an Engineering student & I want to adopt Buddhism as a Religion for my Mental Consciousness n peace , How can I do this and take benefits to improve my Study n Prove my Great purpose of deserve a Human life

        Reply

  13. Mark
    May 19, 2014 @ 7:52 am

    You have a deep understanding of the human mind. I too am trying to improve myself and become more aware of me and life in general. This website is really useful for me. I really need to meet someone like you 🙂 Thanks.

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      May 20, 2014 @ 4:25 am

      Awareness is key. So much good can stem from that. I’m happy that my small contributions can help with your journey. Best wishes!

      Reply

  14. Marty
    May 25, 2014 @ 8:51 pm

    A thought for a future topic for a blog or video. Could you at some point please explain prostrations? I’ve seen videos about the physical technique, but do not understand much about the purpose they serve or how they are intended to benefit one’s practice. P.S. Just started watching your videos this past week and am benefiting greatly from your advice! Thank you!!

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      May 25, 2014 @ 9:22 pm

      Hi Marty, actually I have a whole heap of footage from my time in India on prostrations which I’m just waiting to make a video out of. 😉 Once I’ve given some talks on karma, then the meaning of prostrations will make a lot more sense.

      Reply

  15. Ricardo Zayas
    June 19, 2014 @ 2:38 am

    I thoroughly enjoy your YouTube videos. You are quite knowledgeable and wise for such a young person. I took the three refuges as an old man.I am 62 years of age and have been practicing the Dharma for about 3 years now.after having spent most of my life in a belief based religion, I welcomed the fact that Buddhism is so practical and so scientific.In the Kalama Sutta the Buddha advises us not to follow doctrine based upon tradition or what a teacher may say. When should follow based upon careful examination and experimentation. That being said, I am having a great deal of difficulty buying into the concept of rebirth. I’m having a little bit of trouble dealing with karma based upon a multiple life system even though I have experienced “instant karma vipaka” throughout my life. perhaps I am wrong, but it seems that rebirth and karma are the two concepts in Buddhism which have to be taken on faith.Can you advise me where to look for data which empirically proves that rebirth is fact? once again, your website and your YouTube videos are wonderful and you are an outstanding young woman. Thank you and may you be happy,safe, healthy and at peace.

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      June 20, 2014 @ 3:31 am

      Hi Ricardo,

      I have a few books in my Suggested Reading section which I found helped open my mind to the possibility of rebirth. Life Before Life is probably the closest you will get to finding studies carried out in this area. But it might not be the kind of evidence you’re looking for. I have a video on rebirth which discusses some of the studies, but again it’s not hard scientific evidence.

      The Buddha taught that Right View means to believe in karma and rebirth, so it’s best to keep an open mind about these concepts and not disagree with them outright. Perhaps just put them on the shelf, so to speak, and consider them to be in the realm of uncertainty for now, just acknowledging that one really doesn’t know at the moment.

      There are a lot of people who identify as Buddhists who have difficulty believing in karma and rebirth, and there is even a growing movement of Secular Buddhists who study and practice the teachings without focusing on these concepts. However, as Bhikkhu Bodhi wrote, “The teaching of rebirth crops up almost everywhere in the Canon, and is so closely bound to a host of other doctrines that to remove it would virtually reduce the Dhamma to tatters.”

      You might find his article, “Does Rebirth Make Sense?”, interesting to read.

      Whatever our beliefs in rebirth and karma, at the end of the day I think concentrating our mind on the present and fostering wholesome deeds and tendencies is far more beneficial than getting anxious about whether rebirth exists and if karma functions over many lifetimes. And remember rebirth in Buddhism doesn’t mean the same as reincarnation. There is a difference.

      Your question about believing in rebirth and karma is quite a common one so I hope to address it sometime in another video. 🙂

      Many thanks
      Mindah

      Reply

      • Chris Herdman
        January 11, 2015 @ 1:42 am

        Hi Mindah, I recently discovered an author/psychologist named Michael Newton who did 7,000 past life regressions over 25 years using deep hypnosis. He wrote Journey of Souls and Destiny of Souls. These may be some more books you could recommend when people have science based questions on reincarnation.
        I did not know that rebirth and reincarnation were different. I’m a novice so practicing compassion is all I’m focusing on right now.
        Thanks for all your work!
        Chris

        Reply

  16. Ricardo Zayas
    June 20, 2014 @ 12:24 pm

    Dear Mindah,
    Thank you do much for your recommendation. Now I have some work to do. Just in case Rebirth and Karma are fact, I’m trying to follow the precepts, study, meditate and be kind. Practicing the Dharma is the only sensible and compassionate thing that I can do for myself and for others. Thanks again, Mindah.
    May you be happy.
    May you be safe.
    May you be healthy.
    May you be at ease.

    Blessings to you and yours,
    Ricardo

    Reply

  17. John Ball
    June 28, 2014 @ 6:21 pm

    Thank you for your videos. They are excellent and have provided me the introduction I have been seeking. Please continue to do them. They are appreciated

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      June 29, 2014 @ 1:18 pm

      Thanks John. I’m so pleased to hear that they’ve helped. 🙂

      Reply

  18. Sagar
    July 3, 2014 @ 4:40 am

    Hi Mindah,
    Thanks for sharing your story. I like your videos on you tube and especially your style of delivering the accent and timing is perfect.
    However you say we can ask questions what is channel for that.
    Your last name is Kumar thats an Indian name howz that?

    I was looking for an answer to a basic question.I have seen pictures of Buddha and we see he has hair on his head but all the buddhist minks and nuns have to renounce their hair. I did not find an answer to this as to why so.
    Also there are many more questions but for now thank you and keep doing the great job:)
    regards,
    Sagar

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      July 4, 2014 @ 11:20 pm

      Hi Sagar,

      As I mentioned above, I’m married to an Indian. I took his last name. 🙂

      The Buddha was beyond the need of having to cut a little bit of hair to develop renunciation in his mind. He was already free of craving, hatred and ignorance. You could argue that he should have shaved his head in order to lead by example. I wouldn’t be surprised if it was the case that the Buddha’s hair couldn’t be cut. He had 32 major marks and 80 minor marks (characteristics) about his body that were uncommon and were a result of his previous good karma over many lives.

      I hope that helps.

      Best wishes.

      Reply

  19. AMT
    July 10, 2014 @ 3:21 pm

    Hi Mindah
    I came to find you as I’m going through a extremely difficult of my life and have been looking into internet for resources to help me cope. I’m 20weeks pregnant and my daughter has been diagnosed with Trisomy 18. The doctors have advised us of our options and I am having a very difficult time to accept and to decide how to move forward.

    I have seen your videos on meditation and will look forward to practice it, hopefully, it will help me find calmness, peace and clarity in my mind.

    Thank you very much for putting them up.

    Best wishes.

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      July 11, 2014 @ 3:07 am

      I’m really glad I can offer you meditation techniques during this difficult time in your life. Incidentally, I came across a nice article in our local newspaper today, which you might find helpful to read. You can view it here.

      Wishing you all the best,

      Mindah

      Reply

  20. Binodkumar Longjam
    August 21, 2014 @ 12:22 pm

    Hi Mindah,
    first of all,thank you very much for your youtube videos,i have been watching your videos since 2 months…i read bhudhism in my college time simply as a History subject but after watching your videos and your teachings about Bhudhism, now i am searching about Bhudhism Philosophy….

    Thanking you

    Binodkumar Longjam

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      August 22, 2014 @ 12:37 am

      That’s great Binodkumar! Have fun researching this wonderful philosopy. 🙂

      Reply

  21. chotesiri
    August 30, 2014 @ 4:30 am

    I think that it is a duties of Buddhist both 4 (monk, nun, layman and laywoman) is should be do it to help announce the Buddhism to world population. I am support on your attempt and for me I have be aware that the enlightened person or Buddhist moral code are not this thing , not that thing or not any thing if it is a peacefulness and freedom in my mind.

    Reply

  22. reggy dissanayaka
    September 13, 2014 @ 8:56 am

    I used to be Buddhist monk for 23 years.born in sri lanka and live in usa.the way you explain Buddhism is very closed to the way I learned it.but the way western world ,explain is very logical.for a example ,”impermanent” is regarded to negative in my culture.poor people in my country think life is impermanent so they take as it comes or blame put on “karma”.live in hell.but the Buddha really meant it differently.he preached us”only the thing in this world is pemanents is impermanent”.deep meaning of that is to be in time not on time because of life is fragile.the time and thought more value to the life.in dharmapda he pointed in pali”appamado amatapam pamado mattuno mttuno padam”which means some one who regret in life he is dead and some who enjoy the life he never die.life is too short for us

    Reply

  23. Mike
    September 13, 2014 @ 9:28 pm

    Hello,
    I would be interested to hear your thoughts on the practice of trekchod from the Dzogchen teachings, as a way of directly “cutting through” the self. I read about it in the book, “Waking Up…” by Sam Harris in the chapter on meditation, which I thought was very interesting.
    Thank you very much for your videos and writing. They have helped me very much.
    Mike
    Gilbert, Arizona

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      September 15, 2014 @ 10:23 am

      Hi Mike,

      I have practiced some of these practices and provided they are done with the right understanding and attitude they are a skillful means for helping us to let go and renounce our attachments (especially to the identification of one’s body as self). But to do any of these practices you need a firm grounding in the practices of refuge, compassion and especially bodhicitta. You also need to find a qualified teacher to give you the teachings and transmission. I don’t know if I would necessarily recommend making this one’s sole practice. There are many other practices in Vajrayana that would complement and enhance this one.

      Reply

      • Mike
        September 15, 2014 @ 6:40 pm

        Thank you! I respect your advice and insight!

        Reply

  24. Kostas
    September 21, 2014 @ 7:16 pm

    This is my little story
    I was born in Greece an orthodox country with heavy religious bacround. But at the time of 11 I already knew that Christianity was just not my thing 🙂 so I started research when I found Bouddhism I felt complete it has helped me through so many hard periods of my life and it has helped my to find my way…
    Now I am 16 years old and facing a sort of delema “Which Buddhist school should I follow?” I like that Theravada follows only the Palli rule and that it accepts a more human like Buddha but I love the compation of Mahajana I am confused please help 🙁
    I wish you internal happiness from the bottoms of my heart
    Kostas

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      September 24, 2014 @ 11:39 am

      Hi Kostas,

      The Mahayana is definitely better at bringing compassion to the forefront in their teachings and practices and hence why I gravitate to Mahayana more than Theravada. But there is no reason why you can’t study the Theravada teachings and try to integrate some of the greater compassionate aspects into your personal practice. The Theravadins might emphasize the Buddha’s more human characteristics, however, they don’t deny that he was someone extraordinary as well (he had 32 major marks and 80 minor marks on his body and had trained as a Bodhisattva for lifetimes). I personally listened to my heart and asked myself which teachings caused the most profound change in me. That was how I decided.

      Best wishes
      Mindah

      Reply

  25. Raj Pagarani
    October 13, 2014 @ 9:18 pm

    Hi Mindah,

    Great Website.Thank you so much for creating it.

    As someone new to Buddhism,Im at a point where I want to make it part of my life and live a buddhist life. I did not realise there were so many different schools, with there own methods,practices etc. Im not sure which one to follow.

    My question to you is if I read the recommended books and watch your videos and then start putting into practice what I have learned can I start to say that I am a “practicing buddhist”? Do I need to be part of a tradition like Zen or Tibetan Buddhism? Is is necessary to have a teacher and be part of a Sangha.

    My only goal is to meditate and understand concepts like four noble truths,develop a meditation practice,mindfullness etc and then gain the wisdom which comes through it?

    Thanks so much,

    Raj

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      October 14, 2014 @ 3:56 am

      Hi Raj,

      From what you’ve written it sounds like you might enjoy the teachings from the Theravada Buddhist tradition the most. Their practices include chanting the sutras in Pali, shamatha meditation, walking meditation, mindfulness and dana (giving). Feel free to read as much about Buddhism as you can though. There’s no harm in learning how the different traditions approach Buddhism, since they all have the Four Noble Truths and the Noble Eightfold Path as their essence.

      It would be best if you could take refuge at a Dharma center and be formalized as a Buddhist. Such a ceremony will make an important and long-lasting impact on your practice and the strength of it.

      Having a teacher is definitely beneficial, especially in the beginning stages, because they can guide you skillfully so you don’t have misunderstandings about the teachings or how to practice. But obviously it will depend on how easily you can find a teacher in your locality.

      Best wishes for your practices and study.

      Reply

  26. Raj Pagarani
    October 14, 2014 @ 9:24 am

    Thanks so much Mindah.

    I will look into finding a Dharma centre here in the UK.

    Much love and light.

    Raj

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      October 14, 2014 @ 11:24 am

      Here are the results for a search on Theravada centres in the UK. On the right hand side, you can narrow your search down even more by choosing the Province and then clicking on Search again. I hope this helps. 🙂

      Reply

      • Raj
        January 7, 2015 @ 10:30 pm

        Hi Mindah,

        I only just noticed your response. would you mind pointing out where the link is as I cannot find it on the right hand side.

        Another question, I have read online that people are taking the 5 precepts at home by reading them to themselves and thereby becoming buddhists.Is this possible?I also found a monk who i can e-mail who will initiate me and I do not have to be be there in person.

        Thanks again,

        Raj

        Reply

        • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
          January 8, 2015 @ 12:09 am

          Hi Raj,

          Sorry for some reason it didn’t post my link. Visit this page: http://www.buddhanet.info/wbd/

          On the right you can type in your suburb or area in the “Search for Keyword”. Also tick “Theravada” to do a search in only that tradition if you wish.

          As I said before, it’s best if you can perform the refuge ceremony at a Dharma center. Even if it’s not a center you want to practice at. The ceremony is what is important. Also, taking refuge AND taking the 5 precepts is usually rolled into one ceremony, especially in the Theravada tradition. But taking refuge in the Triple Gem (Buddha, Dharma, Sangha) is the minimum required to officially become a Buddhist.

          Best wishes for your search. Let me know if you have any other questions.

          Reply

          • Raj
            January 8, 2015 @ 1:27 pm

            Thanks Mindah.

            Ok- I thought it had to be at a centre I had to practice at. This helps a lot.

            I have a question. Completely of the topic but what is the purpose of meditation? I completed a 10 day Goenka vipassana course recently and the purpose was to use the body sensations to rid us of cravings,desires,atttachments by observing what comes up and not reacting.If you get a chance and have some time watching “day 5 of Goenkas vipassana discourse” on youtube is what I am referring to.

            I was always under the impression that focusing on in/out breath was to calm the mind,but how will this help me to get enlightened?

            Thanks,

            Raj

          • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
            January 11, 2015 @ 8:42 am

            The reason for calmly observing the body is that if we can observe all phenomena without grasping at it or developing aversion to it, our mind will become more stable and equanimous. This stability is needed in order to progress to deeper states of meditation. When our meditation is developed enough, we can practice insight meditation and realize selflessness.

  27. Virginia Dan
    October 17, 2014 @ 9:03 pm

    Hello Mindah,
    I recently came interested in Buddhism and its teaching .I do regular meditation even for 10-15 minutes a day.Your website and videos were a big help to understand more about bhudhism.

    I am interested in learning more about abhidhamma.Could you Suggest some books or videos for me.

    Thank you. keep up the good work.

    Virginia Dan

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      October 19, 2014 @ 9:22 am

      Hi Virginia, that’s great that you’re interested in the Abhidhamma. You’re certainly diving into the deep end; most people tend to find the Sutras challenging enough. Have a look at this page: http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/abhi/. They have some books in the ‘Supplementary Reading’ section which I think would be good to read. I haven’t read any of them myself so I can’t recommend any in particular, but a lot of the authors are familiar to me. Best wishes for your studies.

      Reply

      • Virginia Dan
        October 29, 2014 @ 10:26 pm

        Hi Mindah,
        Thank you so much for the site….actually my parents and grand-parents are from Sri-Lanka.. and I use to go to temple with them and am use to most of the sutras and so on.. but i am mostly interested in the deep teachings of bhudisem cos i am currently studying
        psychology. As you say ..it does not give a deeper explanation in to what real psychology is….

        I also planing to go for a meditation retreat this year…I found a centre here that is established on the guidance by Mr.s.n Goenka .

        Ill keep you posted about that …

        May the triple gem bless you and family!
        Virginia.

        Reply

  28. Kostas
    October 23, 2014 @ 8:15 pm

    Thanks so much Mindah you are awesome … 🙂 one last question what do you think about zen ?
    Thanks so much again
    Kostas

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      October 24, 2014 @ 2:21 am

      Zen is probably the closest you will get to a blend of the compassion of Mahayana and the simplicity of the Theravada practices (e.g. watching one’s breath, or hara, when meditating). The simplicity of Zen will appeal to people who like minimalism. I always encourage people to go along to centers near them to attend the teachings and practices, and read some Zen books, this will give you the best indication whether it’s the best tradition for you. 🙂

      Reply

  29. Tiffany
    November 13, 2014 @ 5:25 am

    Hi Mindah,

    Thanks for these amazing posts and videos. I am just a bit curious on you became a lay practitioner from a nun after meeting your husband, so i am just wondering if this is allowed in Buddhism and if this will creates a bad karma? I am just being curious on this. ^.^

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      November 14, 2014 @ 8:34 am

      Hi Tiffany, I’m glad you’re enjoying my site and videos. 🙂

      I think whether it’s considered negative to leave monastic life or not will depend on who you talk to and which school of Buddhism they belong to. I know in the Mahayana school you can take ordination up to seven times in the same lifetime. When you take the vows, you generally do so with the wish of it being a lifelong commitment, but it’s acceptable to disrobe and take them again at a later time (perhaps a more suitable time?). They may be stricter in Theravada, I’m not sure. I know that in some countries it’s expected that boys will ordain for a short period of time, e.g. 15 days to 3 months for the Rains Retreat.

      I would say that it really depends on a person’s mindset and why they disrobed in the first place, as to whether they created negative karma or not. For instance, if a realized teacher renounces their robes in order to teach more effectively under certain circumstances, this would be considered good karma. Perhaps though, for the rest of us, if we disrobe because our renunciation has waned and we want to pursue more mundane things, then this wouldn’t really be good karma. So basically it comes down to the person’s intentions.

      Personally I wanted to share my Dharma journey with someone. And although I have a mundane job, all my outside hours are spent on my Dharma work. So I haven’t really decreased my Dharma activities; just changed the manner in which I do them. 🙂

      Reply

      • Tiffany
        November 16, 2014 @ 11:22 am

        Hi Mindah,

        Thanks very much for your reply and explanation! It is very useful.

        I can not agree with you more on the point that whether it is good or bad karma, it depends on the intention.

        However, this is only my personal view, i think the difference between the ordained practitioner and lay practitioner is the renunciation and renunciation means you can leave this mundane world without any grasping on anything(correct me if i am wrong).

        I think for a long term dharma practitioner like yourself will never lose faith in Buddhism, however,for an ordinary people, there are so many distractions which halt us practising, family is one of them. They may easily give up learning Buddhism.

        “I know in the Mahayana school you can take ordination up to seven times in the same lifetime.” is this for both man and women?

        Reply

        • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
          November 18, 2014 @ 3:53 am

          Hi Tiffany,

          You’re right. There are many people who would need the discipline of monastic life to stay focused on the practice and teachings. And that’s the beauty of being ordained, it really removes a lot of our mundane goals and concerns so we can pay more attention to the Dharma. I definitely recommend it if people have an aspiration to go deeper into the practice. But it’s not possible for everyone.

          Renunciation is definitely the major difference between being ordained or lay. You hit the nail on the head. 😉

          Yes, both men and women can be ordained up to seven times (at least in the Mahayana tradition).

          Reply

  30. Ola
    November 14, 2014 @ 7:54 am

    Hi, Mindah! Thank you so much for posting all of this here and also uploading videos on YouTube. I’ve been going through a very hard time and depression almost ate me alive. I couldn’t stop crying, making things worse by having toxic thoughts, and bringing myself and others down by talking (in my head) all the worst things on them. I started doing yoga not too long ago and, since this is very much connected, yoga videos directed me to your channel on YT. This was one of the happiest days of my life! I am usually so opposed to trying new things, since I had never believed in anything like that until a few days ago! Sure, some of the Buddha theories are hard to understand, but you make it easier on us by explaining in detail how it all works. This is very helpful. Reading your bio, I was shocked seeing that I had the exact same reaction out of my first research of Buddhism. I took the biggest inhale and exhale in my life, when I found out you can actually be the master of your mind and let go of all the bad thoughts, get back to your regular self and, which is big here, be a BETTER, HAPPIER PERSON. A few days was enough to significantly reduce my grief and sadness. I was so depressed I thought nothing could save me. This is one of the most wonderful thing to discover. And it’s also, regardless of how hard people think it is, pretty easy, if you think about it. You have a reason that makes you suffer? Eliminate it! Now I’m in the process of letting go and I’m healing incredibly fast. Thank you so much!!!

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      November 14, 2014 @ 9:38 am

      Thank you for sharing your story Ola! It’s really wonderful to hear how the Dharma has changed your outlook on life. It was certainly an extraordinary discovery for me and one I am still enjoying. 🙂 I wish you all the best on your journey of healing, peace and insight. May the Dharma extinguish all the darkness in your mind and fill it with happiness and bliss. Take care!

      Reply

  31. Diptopal
    December 12, 2014 @ 7:46 pm

    Hi Mindah, saw your videos, I liked the simplicity of your presentations. Though I am not a Buddhist, neither do I follow Buddhism, I have been very interested in human psychology and made some notes over the years of my observations on the workings of my own mind trying to figure out the cause of my dissatisfaction and negative emotions. I have come to certain conclusions about negative impressions and unhappiness which are very similar to the tenets of Buddhism. I feel Buddha was an awesome psychologist and that’s what I like about him most. And with the Buddhist teachings, I feel people can at least lead a happy and fulfilling life even without attaining Nirvana. The sole concept of opening up the internal source of happiness is awesome, where an individual can be in a state of bliss without even having to move a finger, he or she could just sit in one place, do nothing externally pleasant and yet be peaceful. I would be very excited to have a discussion with you sometime on dropping desires and getting over negative emotions. I have not meditated ever and all my observations have been by looking at my thoughts closely. I have added you to my circles.

    Reply

  32. Matthew
    December 12, 2014 @ 11:17 pm

    Mindah, first let me say thank you for starting this site and your YouTube site. I have severe PTSD which has opened a world of other issues like OCD, Night Terrors, Intrusive Thoughts, Social Anxiety, and Depression. I went almost two years without speaking to anyone but family and was unemployed unable to leave my home. I now have had a job for over a year, I have cut down on my OCD “rituals” but the rest of my issues remain. I have been searching for something to help me let go of my past, stop fearing the future, and live positively in each present moment. I came across your YouTube site and began watching your videos. They already help me as I watch them just by the way you present each message in such a calming way and I am being very inspired. Buddhism just seems so peaceful, fully transforming, and my wish is to do as you said, “If Buddhism had a motto it would be two words, “Let Go”.” I know this is what I need to do to heal and change my life. I am starting to meditate and can’t wait to see the positive changes to come.

    Thank you,
    Matt

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      December 13, 2014 @ 9:50 pm

      Hi Matt, thanks for sharing your story. It’s nice to hear that things have been improving for you lately, albeit slowly. Keep me posted on your meditation progress. I’m sure it will have a positive impact on your life. Let me know if you have any questions. Best wishes.

      Reply

  33. hove
    December 26, 2014 @ 12:00 am

    sister
    love your inspiring story, and your vids.
    thank you.
    i will definitely share.
    have you ever taken a 10 days retreat in the Goenka tradition ?

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      December 27, 2014 @ 8:45 pm

      No, I haven’t done that particular retreat, but I’d like to. 🙂

      Reply

  34. Dave
    January 1, 2015 @ 4:26 pm

    Subscribed, thank you. Have no idea where this is going:-)

    Reply

  35. Dave
    January 2, 2015 @ 11:41 pm

    Question: When following “the law” is mentioned by Buddha what are the law(s)?
    The intelligent person who leads others not falsely but lawfully and impartially, who is a guardian of the law, is called one who abides by the law (dhammaññha)

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      January 4, 2015 @ 5:26 am

      According to this website http://www.metta.lk/english/Narada/19-Dhammattha%20Vagga.htm the backstory was that some monks saw some judges accepting bribes who made judgements based on this, and the Buddha explained that to follow the law means to abide by the law (i.e. make decisions based on facts and evidence, not by bribes). So the guardians of the law are the judges.

      Reply

      • Dave
        January 8, 2015 @ 1:17 am

        Thank you very much for the response and link. Surprised me!

        Reply

  36. Dave
    January 12, 2015 @ 5:10 pm

    Hi .. Just saw your video with the contribution link. Link did not work from video for me. Is the link on your web site? Tried meditation… First time. 10 minutes went fast. What if you just turn off thinking totally? Is that wrong or do you have to think about breath or counting? Thanks for all your work…You are fortunate to be engaged in something you love to do. No answer necessary…know you are busy. Dave

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      January 12, 2015 @ 9:18 pm

      Hi Dave, if you are refering to Patreon, you can find it here: http://www.patreon.com/mindahleekumar

      Meditation without any fixed object is one type of meditation, however, you need instruction on how to do it properly, otherwise meditation without thoughts could just be some kind of dull-abiding. This is why having an object like the breath or counting is necessary, because it trains the mind in correct mindfulness and concentration. There has to be a strong quality of concentration when we meditate, otherwise it really isn’t meditation.

      Best wishes.

      Reply

  37. John Barnes
    January 29, 2015 @ 7:49 pm

    Hi Mindah-Lee. Your videos have helped me immensely bringing a clarity to the buddhist teachings that has eluded me. My interest in this way of life spans many years and I really appreciate your personal experiences and presentations.

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      January 29, 2015 @ 10:16 pm

      Thanks John! I’m glad you’re enjoying and benefiting from them. 🙂

      Reply

  38. Rev. Douglas Sanyo Reagan, PhD
    February 16, 2015 @ 7:35 am

    Mindah,
    I have really enjoyed your video presentations. You provide a simple wisdom to those seeking the path of peace, love, and enlightenment, which is infectious and life affirming. I am a recently ordained Buddhist Minister and have been sharing your videos with my patients in my Chaplaincy work. I would like to work with you in the future to help those coming to the Triple Gem gain their full perfection. Lets stay in touch! Be well, Gassho…

    Reply

  39. Ed
    February 16, 2015 @ 7:59 pm

    Enjoy your videos very much. Your teachings are very helpful to me. Please keep them coming.

    Reply

  40. Nadika
    February 24, 2015 @ 5:18 pm

    I watched your few discourses its very clear. You are a great women. I wish you to continue your great work till attain nibbana. May you long life and healthy.

    Reply

  41. Cathy
    March 1, 2015 @ 8:38 am

    Hi there
    Great topics on your videos. I just want to make sure that you emphasize to people that one must not be too attached to fear concerning ‘negative emotions.’ Otherwise Buddhism becomes dogma. Fear of negative emotions is attachment. One can only accept them.

    Would you be willing to pray some Loving Kindness my way if I asked you to?

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      March 2, 2015 @ 8:09 am

      Hi Cathy, of course, it’s important though that we don’t reprimand ourselves when negative thoughts and emotions arise. We need to have compassion for ourselves. But we shouldn’t entertain them either. The Buddha did teach the Four Great Efforts, which include preventing and eradicating unwholesome or negative mental states. The reason we should be concerned with them is because of the actions of body, speech and mind that often follows these, and unwholesome actions creates negative karma. As the Buddha said: “To avoid all evil, to cultivate good, and to cleanse one’s mind — this is the teaching of the Buddhas.”

      Attachment to what goes on in our mind is what the Buddha called mindfulness. We should always be continually aware of whether our mental states are positive or not. So some attachments and cravings are useful in some ways.

      May you be happy and free from suffering. Many prayers being sent your way. Take care.

      Reply

  42. Michael
    March 2, 2015 @ 7:50 am

    I have been in “Buddhist world” maybe 30 years. But its now – this year – I have desided to go in it in full power. I wanna “take refuge” and I have contact many Buddhist center here in Sweden. Unfortunately only one have answer. But Im so happy for that. The time will be soon in some weeks. I will take refuge and get a Tibetan Buddhist name (I suppose?). But in same time Im confused in what direction I will go….Tibetan – Theravada. Even Zen is interest.
    I will take refuge in Tibetan Buddhism “Drikung Kagyu” tradition. But I also look in the Theravada direction. Can I “change” later on?

    Thanks for a wonderful site!!!

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      March 2, 2015 @ 9:46 am

      Hi Michael, that’s great that you’ve decided to take refuge! Wonderful. Even though we may be willing to take refuge, we can’t always find a center or someone who can do the refuge ceremony for us. It’s great that the right conditions have arisen for you! Remember, you are taking refuge in the Triple Gem: the Buddha, Dharma and Sangha. You are not taking refuge in a particular human teacher or a particular tradition/school of Buddhism. What you are doing is committing yourself to following the Buddha, his teachings (in general) and the practitioners who have realized his teachings. So please don’t worry about which school you undergo the refuge ceremony in. You are completely free to explore all schools/teachings/practices. It just comes down to a matter of personal preference in regards to which school you may call ‘home’. I wish you all success on the Buddha’s path and I rejoice in the merits of your refuge ceremony! 🙂

      Reply

      • Michael
        March 2, 2015 @ 10:12 am

        thanks you for so quick answer! That really helped me in my thoughts. But of course I´m nervous – regarding the refuge, if I must speak Tibetan and or how it will go – the ceremony. All I want is taking the refuge – I don’t know at all how it will function.

        Reply

        • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
          March 2, 2015 @ 11:53 am

          Don’t worry about doing anything wrong. When I got ordained as a nun I had to repeat Tibetan for an hour, and I’m sure what I said was a terrible attempt at Tibetan. Hahaa… 😉 But the main thing is going with a heart full of faith and devotion, then it doesn’t matter if you do anything wrong. Not all refuge ceremonies are the same, but generally the ones I have seen follow this sort of procedure (in the Tibetan system): the person taking refuge is asked to do some prostrations towards the shrine, imagining it is Buddha Shakyamuni in front of them. Then they kneel before the preceptor who will conduct the ceremony. You are asked to repeat some lines in Tibetan basically saying you are taking refuge in the Triple Gem. You repeat that three times. Don’t worry it won’t be an hour long like a nun’s ordination! They might cut a small amount of hair (just snip one cm of a few strands), mix it with rice, offer it up to the shrine as a symbol of you renouncing old unhelpful ways and having a new beginning; just like how the Buddha cut his hair after leaving the palace. Then you can make a small money offering to the preceptor as a way of saying thank you (just put it in an envelope). They also offer white khatas (scarves) in Tibetan Buddhism as a gesture of sincerity.

          Often in the Tibetan system they don’t give all the five precepts in the refuge ceremony, just the refuge vows. It will differ from teacher to teacher. You should ask whether this is part of the ceremony or not (especially if you would like to take them). But the refuge vows (refuge in the Triple Gem) is enough to qualify you as a Buddhist.

          Reply

          • Michael
            March 2, 2015 @ 1:52 pm

            Thanks again for your nice answers _/|\_
            I will start prepare in mind, soul and knowledge.

  43. Konchog Phuntsog Namgyal (Michael)
    March 22, 2015 @ 7:38 pm

    I did it! I get refuge with Most Venerable Khenchen Konchok Gyaltsen Rinpoche! A wonderful moment. I will now start My new life as a Buddhist. And My wonderful “new names).

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      March 23, 2015 @ 8:44 pm

      Oh how wonderful!! I rejoice in your merit in taking refuge. This is such a beautiful and positive step to take. I am extremely happy for you. 🙂

      Reply

  44. Ben
    March 29, 2015 @ 2:30 am

    Hello Mindah
    I would be lying if I said my heart did not break a bit when I finally found you were married. My hopes were rising when you wrote that you had become a nun. I thought “Oh, maybe there’s a chance that I could meet her and she would come OUT of nun-hood for me!” Please understand, I am happy you are married; I really am. I found you on Youtube while trying to find videos on the relationship between Buddhsim and vegetariansim. I am Buddhist and practice what is known as a “Macrobiotic” diet, which can be exclusively vegetarian if you want it that way. Don’t know why I’m telling you this. As far as Buddhsim goes, I discovered Vajrayana through rock and roll songwriting. As I don’t feel that being a monk is for me, I sincerely pray I meet someone just like you with whom the Great Nature of Mind can be shared and with whom a natural union can manifest–one which will be FOR THE BENEFIT OF ALL BEINGS. You are SO BEAUTIFUL just as that Nature of Mind is, and just like ALL is, if our minds are trained! When I watch your videos I see the deep happiness in you, the smile of Indestructible Joy. You are a very strong woman. I sincerely salute you and your husband; and may he not be jealous at all about my recognition that you are supreme. I am sure he is equally supreme! Finally, may your devotion lead many many beings–all beings–into True Freedom. All the very best to you! –Ben

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      March 29, 2015 @ 9:03 pm

      Hi Ben, now that you’ve put that wish out there to meet someone who can share your Dharma journey, there are more chances it will happen. 🙂 It certainly makes a difference when we find a partner who shares our interest in the same spiritual path. My husband is Hindu but he is beyond supportive of what I do and always encourages me. He’ll always put my Dharma work and practice before himself. People who know him personally are sometimes surprised he is so accommodating, but he says supporting me makes his life meaningful. I’m really fortunate to have him. Best wishes in your search for a suitable partner. 🙂

      Reply

  45. Connie
    April 4, 2015 @ 8:32 pm

    I have always been somewhat interested in the teachings od Buddhism. But, once my son started telling about what he read it became real and most interesting. I think I have a problem retaining and understanding what I read so hearing the information from my son made it so interesting! He referred me to your site and I am reading it so we can discuss the information later. My son practices the hearts way as it seem to agree with him. He made a pretty strong statement about Jesus (which I will not go into for safety sake) but it was not crulevand made perfect sense. So, anyway thank you for sharing your knowledge and experiences with the masses!

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      April 5, 2015 @ 5:31 am

      Hi Connie, I’m really happy to be helping you and your son to have a dialogue about the Buddha’s teachings – that’s great! Thanks for sharing this with me. 🙂

      Reply

  46. Franco
    May 2, 2015 @ 7:51 pm

    Hey Mindah! Greetings from London! Whilst I’ve been meditating on and off for the last 3 years and have an understanding of basic Buddhist teachings, I’m still quite new to the different schools of Buddhism (there are a lot!) Could you perhaps talk about some of the most popular ones in your next video, or possibly guide me to some resources which could help?

    I really appreciate you reading this and I absolutely love what you’re doing. Discovering your site has been the highlight of my day 🙂

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      May 2, 2015 @ 11:05 pm

      Thanks Franco! I’m planning to make a video on that topic in the next coming months as it’s one I get asked about a lot. I hope you enjoy perusing my site in the meantime. 🙂

      Reply

  47. trisha
    May 24, 2015 @ 5:08 pm

    I can only dream of finding my purpose. I know this sounds pessimistic, I know in my heart it can be different but my life experiences keeps going against my heart’s desires. I welcome anything you can suggest that can help. I feel there is something wonderful that needs to be unleashed so that I can began a journey to self-love and discovery of how magnificent the creator has gifted each of us with. I look forward to connecting with you

    Reply

  48. Ed
    June 19, 2015 @ 6:28 pm

    Hi Mindah,

    I stumbled across your site a few weeks ago, specifically the Four Noble Truths video. I think that teaching is the core teaching in the Dharma, and have been practicing and studying with them for the last few years. It’s always good to get another perspective, as the teaching is so rich that it will never be exhausted. I’ve had the opportunity to study it with some great teachers at the Dharma center in New York that I have been going to for the last two and a half years.

    Another area that I think is so rich, and I never tire of hearing about it is the Brahma Viharas.They are such fertile ground for practice. I wonder if you will be doing a video (or four) on that subject any time soon?

    Thank you so much for making these teachings available on this medium.
    Ed

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      June 19, 2015 @ 11:11 pm

      Hi Ed,

      Here’s my video on Metta https://www.enthusiasticbuddhist.com/metta-loving-kindness-practice-universal-love/ and a guided meditation on cultivating loving-kindness too https://www.enthusiasticbuddhist.com/loving-kindness-meditation-metta-bhavana/

      I haven’t covered the other three in detail… yet. 😉

      Best wishes.

      Reply

      • Chad
        July 28, 2015 @ 7:05 pm

        Hi Midah-Lee: I sent you an email but never heard anything from you. Can you please provide answers to below and provide any other contact you know to find answers to below.

        1. How do we differentiate brain (which is inside body) and mind (which is attached to a soul)
        2. Why we use a brain to think
        3. Can’t we attain nibbana without a brain
        4. How did the mind originate and where it came from?
        5. We use the brain and train it to reach Dhayana….can’t we reach these states without a brain
        6. If we are born as an animal, we cannot think because the brain is not developed. So, without a brain, mind is not intelligent enough not cannot see things clearly?

        Thanks, Chad.

        Reply

        • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
          July 29, 2015 @ 5:46 am

          Hi Chad, I’m a little behind on my emails.

          The Buddha hardly spoke about the brain in his teachings. He referred to the mind as the 6th sense organ (obviously an intangible one) that has the nature of detecting thoughts.

          We don’t use the word soul in Buddhism. These two videos of mine might help explain this:

          https://www.enthusiasticbuddhist.com/no-self-selflessness-anatta-anatman-five-aggregates/

          https://www.enthusiasticbuddhist.com/what-happens-after-death-buddhism-reincarnation-true-nature-enlightenment-no-self/

          The Buddha spoke of many formless realms where we can be reborn where we do not have any tangible form. Also there are God realms where you have a body of light. So we can survive and continue our spiritual path without a physical body. The physical body is often seen as an obstacle that we ignorantly cling to as ‘self’.

          The mind is said to have neither beginning nor end. It’s not something the Buddha went into detail on. It was one of those questions he thought wasn’t helpful to one’s practice. He just taught what we needed to know to be free of suffering.

          An animal rebirth is considered one of the unfortunate rebirths precisely because we don’t have the capacity to make moral judgments and increase our spiritual qualities. We need to try and avoid a rebirth there as much as possible.

          Reply

  49. Chris
    July 29, 2015 @ 2:01 am

    Hi Mindah,
    First off, thank you for all of the information that you have given me access to. I recently came across your videos…which lead me to your website. I was wondering if you had an email address that I could send a few questions to.

    Thanks so much,

    Chris
    Email
    Christurley1492@gmail.com

    Reply

  50. Rich Dallas`
    August 7, 2015 @ 3:08 am

    what would be the word for “female GURU”

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      August 7, 2015 @ 9:25 am

      It depends on the Buddhist tradition. In Tibetan Buddhism they tend to use the suffix -ma a lot. For instance, the word Jetsun which means venerable or reverend becomes a feminine form when it’s spelt Jetsunma. Most teachers are called by their title. If they’re a Rinpoche, they will be called that. Most common is the title, Lama. But you can’t just call anyone this. They have to be granted this title by their teacher or someone else who has authority. Though, I should point out that most Tibetan monks are called Lamas even though they are not necessarily in teaching positions. Staying with the Tibetan tradition and honorifics, you might use the suffix -la at the end of someone’s name to show your respect. So I could call you Rich-la. But as I said different traditions would have different names.

      Reply

  51. Rakesh R
    August 9, 2015 @ 9:43 pm

    Hi Mindah,
    Today I was searching on Buddhism on youtube and I found your Buddhist technique vidios. After watching some vidioes ,I must thanks to you for sharing detail insight of Buddha’s Dhamma . Then I came here on your website & gone through your life story to know that how you practice Buddha technique.
    Though I am was born in buddhist family in India , I have never been practicing Buddhas teaching in my life. I had very little knowledge about Buddhas actual practices. In 2013 when I got married I attended the Vippassana course with my wife who had been practicing it since her childhood. After doing Vippassana I feel , this is what I always wanted to know . Then actually I could understood the teaching & techniques of Buddha. It was my first step & now I understood that one needs to put continue efforts and continue practice of Buddha’s teaching to eradicate sufferings.
    May all beings be happy.

    Reply

  52. Chadok
    August 24, 2015 @ 12:42 pm

    Mindah-Lee, Why do you use “Kumar” as last name?

    Reply

  53. Charles
    September 1, 2015 @ 4:06 pm

    Hi Mindha,
    Thank you so much for your video presentations. As a westerner I sometimes find the message in the readings of Buddhism difficult to grasp. The way you explane concepts like the Four Noble Truths and the Noble Eight Fold Path I find clear, simple, and profound. Have you plans to do a video on the Diamond Sutra?

    Thank you again for putting your talks out there.
    May you be happy.
    May you be free from suffering.

    Kind Regards,
    Charles

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      September 1, 2015 @ 10:11 pm

      Thanks Charles, I’ll add the Diamond Sutra to my list of future videos. 🙂

      Reply

  54. Aditya
    September 11, 2015 @ 4:32 am

    Hi Mindah,

    I rejoiced reading your story. I like to take refuge in Buddhism. My mind says it would be perfect if I can take refuge in Bodh Gaya. I have never been to that holy place. Can you advise me if it is possible to do so at Bodh Gaya ?

    Thanks,
    Aditya

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      September 11, 2015 @ 8:04 am

      Hi Aditya,

      Definitely taking refuge in Bodhgaya would be very meaningful. One place that is great for people to stay is Root Institute, it’s designed to cater for Westerners. I don’t know if you want to receive the refuge vows in a particular tradition or not. Root Institute is mostly associated with Tibetan Buddhism. They have quite a busy teaching schedule: http://www.rootinstitute.com/programme_events/spiritual_programme_menu.html You might be able to find a teacher among them who can conduct the ceremony – you would need to ask prior to going. Otherwise, I’m not too familiar with where or who might be able to do the ceremony for you. If Bodhgaya doesn’t look like an option, just receiving the refuge vows in any place is wonderful, so any place you can find is great.

      Reply

  55. Lance
    September 26, 2015 @ 1:54 pm

    For helping me kick start in finding myself and seek to attain enlightenment, I like to dedicate this song to you. “Chakrini – He Gopinath – HQ Audio”, you can find this on YouTube.

    Thank you so much.
    May you achieve more than any lofty targets you set yourself.

    Reply

  56. Vishal
    December 9, 2015 @ 8:45 pm

    Hi Mindah,

    I have watched your videos in youtube and they really helped me a lot in building up my knowledge about buddhism and it’s essence. I would like to share one of my difficulties which is really huge and I hope to seek a beneficial suggestion from you. I am a 26-year-old boy working in small BPO company. I feel like my mind plays see-saw everyday. In short, sometimes I feel like dedicating my whole life to buddhist practice and studies and sometimes I feel like continuing my life normally with basic buddhist practise. These two states arrives most frequently and it has weakened me a lot and made my decision power more wavery. I would be really greatful if you can help me in dealing with this frequent occuring situation.

    Thanks,
    Vishal 🙂

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      December 13, 2015 @ 9:10 am

      Hi Vishal,

      I can understand the pull of both worlds. It’s best not to neglect your spiritual tendencies though, as they are a sign that you are purely yearning for something more than the mundane life will ever provide you. But whether it actually means abandoning your mundane work and becoming a monk or living full time at a Buddhist center to receive teachings – is something that is dependent on whether you already have a connection with a teacher and center now or not. Of course, you could try to study and practice on your own, but if you have the option of living within a Buddhist center with guidance, you will make progress much faster due to many factors.

      If maintaining your current work appeals to you more, than just try to give more time to practice on your weekends: attend weekend retreats or do your own at home. Then during your working day try to incorporate the teachings as much as possible. This way you can make your days spiritual and meaningful.

      Before becoming a nun I was in a very unfulfilled line of work and all I wanted was to receive Dharma teachings every day and practice. So in the end, I followed my heart and I had the benefit of a very clear pathway (already having a teacher and Dharma center to live at). So a lot is dependent on how strong your renunciation towards mundane life is and whether you have access to a center and can make an easy transition. Although, I do believe when the desire for teachings is strong, people can cross oceans when there’s nothing nearby (which many past teachers had to do).

      Anyhow, I understand the stress of having this conflicted mind. Why not try increasing your meditation practice each day and see what clarity dawns from that. I wish you well in making a decision.
      Best wishes.

      Reply

      • Vishal
        January 11, 2016 @ 8:22 am

        Hi Mindal-Lee Kumar,

        I really appreciate your suggestions. I am sure they are going to benefit my practice. And yes, I know a buddhist center nearby my place. I would prefer to dedicate my weekend time to it. You’ve been uploading great videos 🙂 and they have helped me a lot. Thanks so much for uploading those videos.

        Regards,
        Vishal

        Reply

  57. Tharindu Harshana
    December 11, 2015 @ 3:31 pm

    Hi Mindah,

    I have Just watched One of your videos on youtube .I learned a lot having watched that video on loving kindness.
    So I visited this website and went through it.It is wonderful to see Buddhist learning resources are on line.We ALL ARE SPIRITUAL FRIENDS.
    So Keep it up Mindah.I Would like to appreciate you and All beings who made this website possible.
    May All Beings Be Enlightened !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      December 13, 2015 @ 8:48 am

      Thanks Tharindu. I’m glad you enjoyed my video. 🙂

      Reply

  58. prasad
    January 24, 2016 @ 11:38 am

    hi mindah,

    I have watched your youtube videos and this website, they r amazing. hope u keep up the good work. I am a hindu and have explored Christianity, islam and others but to me Buddhism makes the most sense.
    I suffer from schizophrenia, can you suggest how Buddhism or what teachings can help me to slowly cure this mental disease.

    thanks.

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      January 24, 2016 @ 9:37 pm

      Hi Prasad, although the Buddha didn’t talk about schizophrenia in particular, he always pointed to the root cause of our suffering and mental afflictions, as stemming from ignorance. Basically from ignorance we create negative karma of our body, voice and mind, but it is through the purificatory powers of his practices of Right Speech, Right Action, Right Concentration etc, that we can start to purify our minds and see our true nature. We all have our past karma that manifests in one form of another (in my case it’s anxiety), but these practices, in particular meditation, can allow us to distinguish between thoughts we should pursue and those that won’t be beneficial. Having that mindfulness to discern what is beneficial for us is a big step in the right direction of seeing past our neurosis.

      There’s one lady who shares her story with Buddhism and living with schizophrenia, perhaps this might be of interest. http://www.amazon.com/Never-Give-Up-Buddhism-Schizophrenia-ebook/dp/B00PQZGTU4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1453670231&sr=8-1&keywords=buddhism+schizophrenia#customerReviews

      Reply

      • prasad
        January 25, 2016 @ 7:50 am

        Hi Mindah,

        Yes you are right we create negative karma through ignorance, but I don’t know what negative karma I created and if I was ignorant. all that I did was go through the daily motions of life.
        Also some say that a disease like schizophrenia is demonic possession. There have been stories of people getting cured when they called Jesus Christ in their life. I am not sure and also I am a hindu.
        What do you have to say to that? Also right speech and action is a tall ask in this rather difficult world.

        Thanks.

        regards,
        Prasad

        Reply

        • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
          January 27, 2016 @ 8:18 am

          I wouldn’t necessarily equate schizophrenia with demonic possession. People who have been possessed usually don’t show any symptoms of mental illness, and the possession is usually acute (only for brief periods of time). I haven’t had any personal experience with faith healing. But I think it’s quite possible that when one’s faith is strong enough and the conditions are favorable, that people can be healed from physical and mental problems. But it probably depends more on the believer rather than person/entity doing the healing.
          Right Speech and Right Action might be difficult in these times, but it doesn’t mean we shouldn’t try.

          Reply

          • prasad
            January 27, 2016 @ 3:38 pm

            Yes you are right, maybe I give the Buddhist teachings a try.
            thanks

  59. prasad
    January 30, 2016 @ 11:34 am

    Hi Mindah,

    Buddhism doesn’t believe in self/soul(anatta). However, what about consciousness and what happens to it after death? What did the Buddha say about consciousness? In hindu vedantism they say that consciousness itself is soul/self and it is eternal and after death takes a different physical form and that this consciousness is God and its timeless, spaceless and eternal. Can you share some Buddhist perspective on this?
    thanks.

    Reply

  60. Navin Nawani
    February 3, 2016 @ 6:41 am

    Hello Mindah, been following your website and youtube very closely and I can’t thank you enough for the knowledge that you have been sharing with us. It has really helped us to look at life in a much better way now.. God bless you and please keep up the good work. I wanted to ask you if it is possible for you to also post two separate videos specifically explaining the five aggregates (Five Skandhas) and the seven factors of enlightenment (Bojjhanga Sutta). Shall very highly appreciate if you can find some time for the same. Thank you once again. Navin

    Reply

  61. prasad
    February 3, 2016 @ 3:12 pm

    hi mindah,

    is there any video or website or other resource where I can read the abhidharma by the Buddha. thanks.

    Reply

  62. prasad
    February 7, 2016 @ 10:16 am

    hi mindah,

    often I am at crossroads whether I should choose Vedanta or Buddhism. one says there is soul and the other there is none. Can’t decide. Am confused. What do you say? If u follow Buddhism then it says that there is no self, well then who is he that is typing this comment?

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      February 7, 2016 @ 11:58 am

      Hi Prasad, the main difference is that Buddha recognized that even consciousness is impermanent and constantly changing, so it can’t be pinned down as something solid and permanent. A soul suggests an unchanging phenomena, which the Buddha’s realization of impermanence cannot support. But the Buddha did say that we have a continuous stream of consciousness or awareness (which changes momentarily) and gives us the experience of being eternal.

      In Buddhism, it’s often expressed that there is ‘action’, but there is no (solid and permanent) ‘doer’ behind the action. We have awareness, we have consciousness, we will continue to take new physical forms and have new rebirths until we become enlightened and recognize our true nature and break the bonds of our ignorance.

      Perhaps in the end it depends on how strongly your connection with a God is. In Hinduism, the idea is that consciousness is God. A Buddhist practitioner would still experience a similar experience of feeling light, bliss, and an expansion of consciousness, but wouldn’t identify as this as being their God-self, or something received from a God. Instead, these heightened states of awareness are seen as experiences that arise as consciousness is freed from our defilements of craving, aversion and ignorance, and freed from the karma created by these.

      In general, I think both religions go through similar meditative experiences, but the understandings or realizations of these are different. The realizations in Buddhism are said to uproot our ignorance, break us free from continued rebirth and establish us in everlasting happiness. Also Buddhist teachings emphasize the need for increasing one’s wisdom and not getting trapped in blissful or non-productive meditative states, but trying to always work on reaching the ultimate freedom and insight of enlightenment.

      If you’re confused about which to choose, because you prefer the notion of something permanent and lasting like a soul. Well, you don’t need to be afraid, because realized Buddhists experience only freedom and happiness as their meditation and realizations increases. As we move closer to our true nature, it’s said we experience happiness in our body and mind. So the notion of fear or losing something dear, doesn’t even arise. Fear is based in the intellectual mind, while meditative realization and freedom comes from experience, which trumps the small egoic fearful mind any day. 🙂

      Reply

  63. prasad
    February 7, 2016 @ 4:17 pm

    Hi Mindah,

    Thanks for a detailed reply, it gave me lot of insight.
    The key difference as you pointed out is Vedanta believes in a permanent consciousness whereas Buddhism believes even consciousness is impermanent so no self.
    But u also say (excuse me for using texting language, hope that u bear with me, its become such a habit) that the Buddha believed that there’s a continuous stream of consciousness and thereby rebirth. But if consciousness is impermanent then how can it be continuous and how can it be there if the body dies. besides even animals have consciousness too, does it mean that even they r reborn? and btw where does this consciousness hang after the previous body dies and it takes shelter in the new body?
    besides when one attains nirvana and next parinirvana its said that we are liberated then where do we go, is it something like the fire gets extinguished? also where is the Buddha today after his parinirvana? is he there in some realm or the Buddha has been lost for ever and so we all when we attain parinirvana do we just die off? also how did humans get manifested in the first place to begin with? who lighted the fire of life to begin with? if before beginning there was only nirvana state then why did we get manifested? life should not have begun. what do u say?
    Please don’t get a feeling that I am challenging u or something, I m just asking questions which come to my mind. Also these questions don’t imply that I side with the vedantic angle to these things bcoz I m not a fan of the god hypothesis also. I just wanna know the right answer.
    also in the middle of ur reply u say ‘it depends upon how strong the connection with god is’ , this left me a little confused, don’t they believe in Buddhism that there is no god, so where does this statement come from or what does it mean?

    I have asked u many questions here, hope u don’t mind them.

    Reply

  64. Jag
    February 8, 2016 @ 7:46 pm

    Mindah,

    I listened to and performed the Loving Kindness Meditation. It was wonderful. Thank you so much for sharing it with everyone. Anychance I could download an MP3 – say from iTunes store?

    jag

    Reply

  65. prasad
    March 8, 2016 @ 8:34 am

    Hi Mindah,

    I happen to come across a video on Buddhism. As per that video the anatta or no-soul teaching is not original Buddha teaching and that it was started by the Theravada school of Buddhism. it says that there is a soul and its called citta and purified citta is nirvana/nibbana.
    What do you have to say about that?

    Here is the link to the video –

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FEnb2cFWKBs

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tbqTXx7m9j4

    Reply

  66. Sunil Kumar Singh
    March 25, 2016 @ 8:21 pm

    Hi Mindah ji
    and Prasad ji,

    It is in the process of watching the movie GAUTAM BUDDHA that I came across this website. The videos by Mindah on Buddha’s preachings are very interesting and easy to understand.

    The importance of Buddha’s preachings in today’s world of growing hatred and violence is highly relevant as these can help instil brotherhood amonsgt people. But at the same time, as brought forward by Prasad ji, Buddha was more a moral preacher than a philosopher. He was not a metaphysician or a scientist or a zoologist or an astronaut. He perceived the sufferings in the world as effects of the diverse practices. Basically we are all one, so it is not logical to have divergent practices. Even if there are minor dicferences, they must converge to some unity.

    Buddha’s preachings have their importance in terms of right view, right intention and right practices-collectively as moral preachings, the motive of which certainly is to instil brotherhood amongst people and remove hatred and violence. But, at the same time, his personal experiences such as the concept of sufferings, their solution and salvation and rebirth do not stand a scientific scrutiny.

    As mentioned above by Prasad, the connection with god is also confusing as Buddhism is one of the religions that are based on moral conduct and not on the supremacy of god. It is a religion where Siddharth Gautam is a guide and not a god or messenger. Also, the cocept of salvation and freedom from rebirth is misleading and put it at par with other religions that harbour so many superstitions.

    Nevertheless, the beauty of Buddhism lies in its moral preachings, which, when practiced, can make this world a better place to co-exist.

    Reply

    • prasad
      March 27, 2016 @ 6:01 am

      Hi Sunil ji,

      well said that the Buddha was more a moral teacher than a philosopher. In that sense from a spiritual standpoint its lacking explanation.

      Reply

  67. prasad
    March 27, 2016 @ 11:52 am

    Hi Mindah,

    How r u? I have noticed that you are not pleased with some of my comments here. Many of my comments are awaiting moderation. I say sorry to u if u r offended. My only effort was to get answers to my questions, I may not be the brightest one but I thought u will put up with it. Plz don’t stop communicating. Thanks.

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      March 29, 2016 @ 2:43 am

      Hi Prasad,

      I think it’s good to question and it’s precisely the fact that we don’t know, that we need to test the teachings for ourselves and put them into practice to find out for ourselves. The Buddha advised that people need to practice and realize the truth for themselves. When we’re just starting out, we won’t be able to accept everything on blind faith, but through our practice, we will realize how much truth is in the Buddha’s words. Generally the Buddha taught that the five aggregates do not constitute a self, and we misapprehend these (form, feeling, etc) as being who we are. What appears to remain is some form of continued awareness or cognition, the purified mind. We don’t disappear; consciousness lives on but in a purified state. But given this awareness also continuously changes, moment to moment, it cannot be called permanent and therefore a soul. Any form of grasping would go against the law of impermanence. But since there is some continuity of sorts, it would be easy to label it a spirit or soul. Generally, it’s the wisdom that perceives this impermanence that breaks us free of this chain of grasping and allows us liberation from rebirth; belief in a soul doctrine does not. I hope this helps. 🙂

      Reply

      • prasad
        March 29, 2016 @ 5:58 am

        hi mindah,

        ok. followed that. but to practice what the Buddha did is almost so impossible especially in the times we r living in. its a different world now than it was in buddha’s time. but anyways I understand that there is awareness that remains which also is changing. thanks for the clarification. 🙂

        Reply

        • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
          March 29, 2016 @ 8:30 am

          I don’t think the world has changed that much. People still suffer from the same afflictive emotions of craving, anger, lust, ignorance, etc. The landscape of the world might look a bit different, but we’re still dealing with the fact that we need to learn to master our minds which can be done slowly, day by day, through effort and meditation.

          Reply

  68. prasad
    April 17, 2016 @ 3:21 pm

    hi mindah,

    how r u?
    looks like during moderation of my comment u deleted it. that’s ok.
    maybe u didn’t like it. if it is so I say sorry for the same.
    look I come from india and over here god is a big thing. u r married to an indian so u too may know about it.
    the god/saint shirdi sai baba is very popular where I live.
    he himself said that he is god incarnate. that’s a very tall claim, so I asked ur opinion about it.
    I too feel there is god. so be it. since in spiritual matters u r far ahead of me given ur past background so I asked what u think about it and feel in general. so it is.
    ok thanks. take care.

    regards,
    Prasad

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      April 17, 2016 @ 10:33 pm

      Hi Prasad, I don’t know about Sai Baba. Perhaps you can look at the information currently on the internet about him. Always check their behavior – try to get a sense of whether it seems more ego-orientated or not. Generally if a person really has such high realizations and an awakened mind, they wouldn’t go around proclaiming it and would probably be more humble about it. I tend to follow the Buddha’s teachings, that another fully enlightened being (Maitreya) will appear, but not for a VERY long time. So perhaps other people might develop some realization from their practice, but they couldn’t be at the stage of Buddhahood. I would just follow your heart with this one.

      Reply

      • prasad
        April 20, 2016 @ 5:22 am

        thanks mindah.

        Reply

  69. prasad
    April 29, 2016 @ 3:32 pm

    hi mindah,

    how r u?
    what’s the Buddhist position on God?
    Is there god or is there not god?
    I tend to lean towards there being a God?
    How can the universe run without there being a god?

    anxiously waiting for ur answers.
    thanks.

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      April 29, 2016 @ 10:19 pm

      According to the Buddha, there are many different realms of existence; the God realm is just one of them. Apparently Gods are born into a realm of luxury due to their past good karmic actions but they are still not free of Samsara. They can also exhaust that karma and be reborn in a human or other realm again. Only through meditation and insight can we achieve complete liberation from Samsara. The Buddha was a teacher to the Gods, teaching them the Dharma. Buddhism doesn’t believe that there is a sole creator like a God that created or runs the universe. The universe is governed by karma and other natural laws.

      Reply

      • prasad
        April 30, 2016 @ 5:59 am

        thanks mindah for your prompt reply.
        its good to know that the Buddha was a teacher to the gods. that’s amazing.
        ur last statement that “The universe is governed by karma and other natural laws.” is agreeable. that the karma rules out day to day dealings is acceptable, but who put/created the karma or natural laws in place, bcoz I think someone must have created them that way instead of them arising on their own. what do you say to that?

        Reply

        • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
          April 30, 2016 @ 6:52 am

          Why is it that someone had to create something for it to come into being? Things are continuously coming into existence due to many causes and conditions, why does there have to be just one cause? Questioning things like how the world was created and other such questions, are things the Buddha said distracts us from the real problem at hand – freeing ourselves from our current suffering. He showed us a path and taught us the methods. We are only wasting our time to theorize over things that don’t bring liberation (the Buddha’s words, not mine). 😉

          Watch this video for the specific suttas: https://www.enthusiasticbuddhist.com/4-key-characteristics-of-the-buddhas-teachings/

          Reply

          • prasad
            April 30, 2016 @ 11:35 am

            thanks mindah, well said.
            ok it means it concentrates on life rather than the origins of life.
            apart from what we have been conversing lemme talk about something else.
            although I wont equate it with suffering but I am schizophrenic so how can Buddhism help me get rid of it or rather illnesses in general.
            mindah, what do u say is Buddhism a philosophy or religion. my view is that its a philosophy.
            I am a hindu so I wont get any support from the family if I wish to practice Buddhism, I mean they just wont even entertain my argument.
            anyways I think one can practice the eight fold path irrespective of which religion he belongs to. what do u think?
            I find a lot of peace in Buddhism. so much so that even looking at an image of Buddha gives u peace. but with my schizophrenic mind its hard to meditate.
            thanks for bearing with me and answering my questions.

          • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
            May 3, 2016 @ 11:08 am

            I think we should practice Buddhism to end all suffering, not just the sufferings of our current life. I don’t know whether Buddhist practice will necessarily cure schizophrenia, but it can probably help in how you relate to the experiences you have (in terms of being an observer and trying not to get caught in them).
            Hindus believe that the Buddha is a reincarnate of Vishnu, so revering the Buddha shouldn’t really be a problem. You can always participate in Hindu rituals with your family but have your devotion to the Buddha; you have to work with your current circumstances.
            The Noble Eightfold Path can mostly be practiced by anyone. It’s Right View which is particularly Buddhist.
            I know a Buddhist with schizophrenia. He’s certainly had his good and bad times, but he’s been very diligent to try and keep to a regular practice. I think when the motivation and inspiration is strong you can find ways to do small bits of practice every day.

  70. prasad
    April 30, 2016 @ 2:15 pm

    hi mindah,

    I have one more question, what is the lotus sutra?
    and does the lotus sutra teach something other than the 4 noble truths? basically what does it teach?
    thanks.

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      May 3, 2016 @ 11:11 am

      I am yet to study the Lotus Sutra in depth myself. I think it would be better to do a search on the internet until I find time to try and make a video on it.

      Reply

      • prasad
        May 5, 2016 @ 4:08 pm

        i think u r right in your previous comment. I can be a hindu n still practice Buddhism. u stressed right view and I too think its very important. I watched ur video and u kept the right view at the very end.
        God bless.

        Reply

  71. Thanh
    May 27, 2016 @ 6:26 am

    Thanks very much for sharing your story.
    I have learned about Buddhism for a long time but recently I started to practice Buddhism and mindfulness meditation.
    Your blog is really helpful. I really appreciate it.
    Keep up your good work.

    From France with love.
    Thanh

    Reply

  72. Viran
    June 3, 2016 @ 7:14 am

    Dear Mindah, i hope you believe in NIBBANA. The following buddhist monk believed to be an ARAHANT. kindly go through the PDF (English). http://www.mahanuwara-wajirabuddhi-thero.org/EN

    Reply

  73. prasad
    June 11, 2016 @ 3:37 pm

    Dear Mindah,

    Do you believe in God?

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      June 15, 2016 @ 9:45 am

      Hi Prasad, not in the way of Gods being a creator, no. I posted the Buddhist view of Gods in an earlier answer to you. Please scroll up. 🙂

      Reply

      • prasad
        June 18, 2016 @ 6:52 am

        ok I got it. so you align with the Buddhist views.
        the thing is I come from india the land of spirituality. over here there was a saint/god avatar like Shirdi Sai baba. he clearly said that there is god and he is the master of all of us. so I don’t know which view to align to, so I asked for your perspective. crores of people are his devotees and they simply take him for god/avatar. intellectualy speaking the Buddhist view is more sensible but spiritually speaking the shirdi sai is more appealing. its just too confusing.
        what do you say? ofcourse I got your reply but still……..

        Reply

        • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
          June 21, 2016 @ 7:39 am

          Hi Prasad, just because many people believe and follow one teacher doesn’t mean it’s the right choice. Why not follow both and see which you have a stronger pull towards over time.

          Reply

          • prasad
            June 22, 2016 @ 6:42 am

            Dear Mindah,

            Thanks. From the face of it the choice is obvious its Lord Buddha all the way. Its because His teachings are practical, realistic and true.
            I think what binds the world is the law of karma isn’t it? What do you say?

          • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
            July 14, 2016 @ 10:31 pm

            Yes, karma is a central principle in Buddhism that governs most of our experiences. If we create positive karma, it allows us to experience positive conditions conducive for reaching enlightenment. The Buddha’s teachings are certainly practical and it’s only by really practicing them that we gain faith in his teachings. The Buddha highly encouraged people to PRACTICE his teachings and find out the truth for themselves.
            I personally find the Buddha’s teachings resonate with me. So for me, it’s the path I choose to follow. But for some people they might choose a different path. Everyone has to come to their own conclusions. But it’s best if those conclusions are derived from practice and experience.

  74. prasad
    July 27, 2016 @ 10:10 am

    dear mindah,

    I don’t think there r any conflicts in the paths set by the various saints or avatars. all paths lead to the divine whether its buddhas path or jesus path or Krishna’s path and so on. not only that and not only we should keep our karmas right but karma in the form of thoughts should also be pure and good. we all including all life forms are spiritual beings. we should be noble in out thoughts, words n actions.

    your noble thoughts on the same.

    buddham sharnam gacchami. om sai ram.

    Reply

  75. Filipa
    July 27, 2016 @ 10:23 pm

    Dear Mindah,
    First of all, thank you so much for sharing the teachings of the Buddha with us in such a simple and yet fulfilling way. I have learnt a lot with your videos and have been putting an effort into changing certain aspects about myself. I have also bought and read three of the books you have recomended in this website. You motivated me greatly, I saw most of your videos and I am happy I found your youtube channel!
    I decided to write to you because I have been having some trouble with my practice, you see,
    at first, I felt great, I believed and agreed with just about everything the Buddha taught, it all made sense to me. I started to meditate almost every night and did my best to become a more understanding and loving person. I even started to avoid eating meat whenever I could, hoping to make a difference even if a small one and I did get better, but at the same time, I started to resent my past, I started to see what an idiot I had been. I know the past is the past, and I should move on, but I don’t know how.
    I have been having problems while meditating, I feel unworthy of such a beautiful and pure perspective. It is as if I’m dishonoring the Buddha by not succeding and not following the Dhamma at times, for not being how I should be. Eventually I started to feel resentful towards my practice and this has been evolving like a snow ball rolling down a hill top.
    I am also haunted by the future in many ways and have been having anxiety crisises again, which I hadn’t had since I started to practice meditation. I believe I need motivation but am not sure where to get it from. I am also a teenager (and a girl), so maybe this questioning also has to do with my age? But I would really love to find my way to happiness anyway haha!
    Well, appart from that, there is also the fact that I am very emotional and defensive when facing injustice and I become, easily angry and judgemental. A terrible trait, I know. I need to learn how to deal with certain realities and yet the violence of this world haunts me and I can’t seem to accept it.
    I have made progress, but I don’t think it has been enough. I don’t know any buddhist people I can talk to so I have hundreds of questions and can feel very lonely sometimes, it’s hard to keep it up all by yourself xD
    Anyway, these are my main issues: motivation, confidence and hatred/violence.
    Forgive me for the long post, I tried to summerise everything. I also apologise for possible spelling mistakes, since I’m Portuguese.
    Thank you so much once again, for helping me so much already! I hope you make more videos!
    May you be happy,
    Filipa x

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      July 31, 2016 @ 9:46 am

      Hi Filipa,
      I apologize that my reply is brief, but I just wanted to say that forgiveness is important in Buddhism: forgiving others and forgiving ourselves. Doing metta meditation can help us forgive our past. And since you’re only a teenager, I’m sure you haven’t done anything so bad that can’t be forgiven! Everyone has done things they’re not proud of. The important thing is that we acknowledge where we’ve made mistakes, and we resolve to do better in the future. But we don’t hate ourselves if we still don’t get it right; we’re all trying. Buddhist practice is simply that – it’s a practice. And we need to practice patience and kindness with ourselves.
      Your meditation should be a place where you can recharge and listen in to your inner wisdom. It’s a place for cultivating concentration which leads to many benefits in our daily life. We shouldn’t meditate with any expectation. Just do your best and the benefits will come.
      There is certainly a lot of violence in the world. But let’s try to not add more to it. Encourage your compassion for the world and its inhabitants, but don’t get angry with them if they act out of ignorance. What’s important is what you do with your own mind and actions. Being a peaceful person daily will help the world.
      I hope some of what I’ve written here might be helpful. Much metta to you.

      Reply

  76. prasad
    July 28, 2016 @ 11:31 am

    dear mindah,

    the Buddha prolly is the tallest figure of spirituality. I am a hindu but I would rate him even above Krishna the supreme god of Hinduism bcoz I think the Krishna story is all about fairy tales n mythology.
    I think the Buddha understood the supreme reality or secret of this world. but to follow the eightfold path wont be easy. my comments r fluid, I comment as the thoughts come to my mind. if u want u can comment on those r just let them be. ur blog is a great means to converse. how I wish even I could attain enlightenment, forget about enlightenment even simple meditation is difficult for me.

    buddham sharnam gacchami.

    Reply

  77. prasad
    July 28, 2016 @ 2:04 pm

    dear mindah,

    I was browsing other sections of this website and I came across ur blog on the maitreya Buddha. I have something to comment on this.
    this maitreya character is a new age propaganda. there’s apparently a maitreya who is supposed to come who will represent the new Christ or new Krishna or new Buddha as in ur blog. please don’t fall for it. its new age stuff. there was just one Buddha who was born on this earth some 2500 years ago and he is enough for the worlds needs. he and his teachings stand tall even to this day. there’s not going to be another Buddha for the real Buddha attained parinirvana 2500 years ago and he is still amongst us thru his teachings as ur site propagates.
    hope this helps. my 2 cents on the topic.

    buddham sharnam gacchami.

    Reply

  78. prasad
    July 31, 2016 @ 8:03 am

    dear mindah,

    nice website logo. the lotus flower drawing is very sweet.

    Reply

  79. Lucia Murguia
    August 11, 2016 @ 12:59 am

    Hi Mindah,
    My name is Lucía and I’m from Mexico.
    My family and I are starting a new stage in our lifes, with so many blessings and challenges.
    While looking for inspiration for our new home, I found Patrice Murciano’s Buddha artwork.
    https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=patrice+murciano%27s+buddha&view=detailv2&&id=905480C15ED9DF2918176DAC315D55CB36C1A925&selectedIndex=1&ccid=jDH3BePa&simid=607989781914914721&thid=OIP.M8c31f705e3dabc6d91ea889fe1ee9192o0&PC=APPL

    As you said, this image inspires me peace and joy, so my husband bought it!
    But here’s the question: I have being searching the meaning of its posture (head on the right knee), and I only found that in some sites they call it the “resting buddha”.
    Can you help me? Do you know more about this buddha? Where can I get more information?
    Hope you can help me.
    Thank you very much, and as a button line, I enjoy very much your videos.

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      August 14, 2016 @ 1:58 am

      Hi Lucia,
      It’s great to hear that the Buddha’s image inspires you. 🙂
      Actually this is not a traditional pose of the Buddha, but something created by a modern-day artist (I don’t know who).
      The Buddha is often seen in different poses, such as hands in meditation, one hand raised offering fearlessness, hands in teaching posture, etc. These are called mudras and their meaning and power is explained in the suttas. There is, however, a Buddha pose that shows him lying down on his right side. This was the posture he took just before he passed away.
      This resting Buddha posture (which you refer to) isn’t found in the suttas. But since the artwork still depicts the Buddha, it is still worthy of homage and veneration. I hope you enjoy it.
      Best wishes.

      Reply

  80. Shawna
    August 12, 2016 @ 5:36 am

    I studied Buddhism in college and was interested in the practices. Three months ago my sister who was extremely close to me passed and i couldn’t understand life. This led me to start meditation and then start practicing Buddhism. I thank you for helping me as well as i learn to understand what life is all about and find out who i truly am and how i calm help other people instead of only thinking about myself. It helps me to stop back from my anger and sadness and to understand have compassion for everyone that crosses my path.

    Reply

  81. prasad
    August 23, 2016 @ 5:38 am

    dear mindah,

    coming from a deeply god-fearing/god-believing country/society its difficult to suddenly turn into a non-believer. its difficult to shed the old beliefs. following the eight-fold path is also difficult. the two ideologies are very different.

    Reply

  82. Robert
    September 19, 2016 @ 6:45 pm

    Mindah,

    I’m at a crossroads in my life and seeking other ways of understanding. I have had bad experiences with Christianity in the past, and so I’ve began looking in other directions. I’ve visited temples in South Korea several times in my life (about 7 temples), and have an interest in Jogye Buddhism in particular. Having read about different doctrines, it seems to align with what I’d like to practice as well. That said, the nearest Jogye Temple to my house is over 2 hours away, and does not offer services in English. How important is it for a person to be surrounded by the community in Buddhism, and would it be acceptable to practice at one of the closer temples that may be in a different order? Any insight would be greatly appreciated.

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      September 25, 2016 @ 11:48 am

      Hi Robert,

      There’s nothing wrong with participating at other Buddhist centers. You never know, you might enjoy the practices and teachings there too, even though they’re from a different order. Certainly having a sangha community can be a great benefit, because you can share the journey with them and clarify doubts. I would suggest going to a couple of different temples close to you and seeing which one you connect with more. And perhaps you might find some online communities that practice in your preferred tradition as well.

      Good luck with your search.
      Best wishes,
      Mindah

      Reply

  83. prasad
    October 27, 2016 @ 10:02 am

    dear mindah,

    How are you? A very Happy Diwali to you.
    I’d like to know the Buddha’s view on consciousness, as to whether it survives death and the same vis-a-vis rebirth. Can you please inform about the same?

    Thanks,
    regards,
    Prasad

    Reply

  84. prasad
    November 3, 2016 @ 3:30 pm

    dear mindah,

    after watching the anatta videos I have a few questions in my mind. I will list them shortly, I m trying to compile them in my mind first.

    Reply

  85. prasad
    November 3, 2016 @ 3:45 pm

    dear mindah,

    in reference to the anatta videos.
    mindah, u said that after death the old consciousness is replaced by the new consciousness but where is the location of the old and new consciousness? where is it physically? also how does the new consciousness enter into a new body and is this body the embryo of a potential new born baby or how is it or in what type of body does it enter?
    secondly the Buddha says even animals also r conscious beings so does the xfer of old to new consciousness happen across both animals and humans? besides how come the xfer takes place at the exact minute of one person dying and the other new born baby being born at the same time, what if the dead and the new body or new born r continents apart how does the xfer take place and who does this xfer? can u please elaborate on these issues?
    also do I understand it right that nirvana(unrestricted awareness) is beyond even consciousness?
    also will it matter that a schizophrenic like me, whose mind is definitely challenged and thereby I presume even consciousness, will it matter that at the time of death when my old consciousness is transformed into a new one there will be hangover of the previous old consciousness and my new consciousness is also screwed up? can u address these questions?
    I m sorry its a long list but what to do, these questions have surfaced in my mind.

    thanks,
    regards,
    prasad

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      November 5, 2016 @ 9:21 pm

      Consciousness doesn’t have a physical location. If we look at the term ‘unrestricted awareness’, you can become aware of things that aren’t in your immediate physical location. Consciousness becomes more expansive as you practice. Also, each moment of consciousness builds on the former one, so it is changing moment to moment; every moment is the death of the former moment of consciousness.

      Depending on the karma we create, our consciousness will be attracted to being reborn in different states. If we keep our mind mostly pure, we will be reborn in places that are more pure and have more favorable conditions. It might be that we’re reborn in a favorable human rebirth or even a spiritual realm where one has a light body, rather than a physical one. But all rebirths are impermanent; our karma directs us to the next one. According to the Buddha we can certainly be reborn as an animal. If we spend most of our life in ignorance and don’t develop our intelligence, and only crave food and sex, it can create the causes for an animal rebirth.

      When we die we enter what is called the bardo state. We can remain there for up to 49 days before our karma directs us to a new rebirth.

      My understanding is that consciousness never fully ceases but that when we reach nirvana all karmic craving and attachment ends and so continued rebirth also ends. One remains in a state of profound peace and bliss. But if one was to follow the Mahayana path, then you would choose to be reborn to continue helping others and develop your practice so you can become a fully enlightened Buddha.

      It’s said that our true nature is pure and free of all defilements, so any mental illness we experience is a temporary ripening of past karma, but by planting seeds of merit and good karma now, we can prevent that karma from continuing. Even by creating good karma in this life can affect how previous karma ripens; it can be less severe than if we don’t practice.

      I hope this helps clarify things for you. 🙂

      Reply

      • prasad
        November 6, 2016 @ 6:23 am

        hi mindah,

        it has clarified a lot of things for me. thanks. for the first time I learnt of the bardo state. also as per you consciousness is non local so that’s also a first for me. however knowing this has raised some questions in my mind. can you elaborate on the bardo state or googling it will suffice?
        I think all those great souls that have been born had an expanded state of consciousness or unrestricted awareness. that explains why they were so holy.
        all in all it has increased my knowledge about consciousness.

        Reply

        • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
          November 6, 2016 @ 8:32 pm

          I’m glad I helped clarify some points for you. Just googling the bardo state will suffice; I don’t have in-depth knowledge of it.

          Reply

  86. prasad
    November 14, 2016 @ 9:18 am

    dear mindah,

    I am a hindu. the saints and holy persons of my religion have clearly stated that there is God. Buddhism, however doesn’t say there is God so which one do I accept? Can u clarify the same?

    thanks,
    regards.

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      November 15, 2016 @ 12:43 pm

      Prasad, if you identify with being Hindu, then it would make sense for you to follow what Hinduism teaches. There’s no reason you cannot practice Buddhist meditation and still follow your Hindu religion. Buddhism says that Gods exist, but they are not regarded as a creator or one we need to ‘seek union with’. The Dalai Lama recommends that people don’t necessarily change their religions, but they try to practice some daily meditation. If you feel more comfort with the Hindu practices and teachings, then I would recommend that you continue practicing them. No need for all this inner conflict. Just try to meditate and find peace within. 🙂

      Reply

      • prasad
        November 15, 2016 @ 2:02 pm

        dear mindah,

        thanx for ur reply. You have so clear answers to my questions. u r right I have inner conflict and I m confused. but ur replies help me get some clear direction. the world is so confusing. I mean some say one thing like the saints of my religion and others like Buddhism, Jainism say other. one is caught between the two. u say I can practice meditation. I m sure meditation irrespective of whether its Buddhist or not helps. but how will I attain nirvana if I don’t practice the 8 fold path. life is short and in it u have so many confusing choices. although I m a hindu I don’t find peace in their rituals, but the existence of god(as said by the saints) is so overwhelming that I don’t know if Hinduism is right or Buddhism. I just want to be on the right path bcoz both of them cant be true. let alone all this I m struggling in life that’s something else – I m jobless n I have mental issues which u know – I mean all the problems have converged at the same time. even meditating is so difficult bcoz even normally I find it hard to concentrate. feels like the entire mind is blown up all the time,its not a nice feeling. well my problem list will run in pages so…….. . anyways looking at the buddhas image gives me so much peace. and my hindu gods dont seem to solve some of my problems. u r much more advanced n progressed than me but once u were saying that there is maitreya Buddha, mindah plz dont fall for that, this maitreya stuff is all new age n occultic and some people in the spiritual realm r trying to promote it in the world and mislead them, no one can come close to the original Buddha who is our path shower who lived in indo-Nepal some 2500 years ago and attained nirvana. I m 42 yrs old n still unmarried, imagine the tension my parents are in bcoz they would like to see their son hold a job n get married. anyways why trouble u with my personal problems. I m suffering and its been so for so many years now there’s no respite. I think god is making me go thru this so that I become more humble. whats the way out. thanks.

        Reply

        • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
          November 17, 2016 @ 11:39 am

          Prasad, no matter which path you choose, they both teach the same fundamentals – that we have to practice morality, kindness, patience and meditation. If you feel devotion to any Hindu Gods or Buddha, then honor and encourage that. Otherwise just try the best you can to be a good person. You obviously have some significant challenges in this life, so please practice some compassion for yourself. Don’t worry about the future, try to take care of today and this moment… If you find meditation too difficult, then listen to Buddhist talks, watch videos, read books. Just do what calms your mind and brings some happiness.

          Reply

          • prasad
            November 17, 2016 @ 3:04 pm

            dear mindah, thanx again for a clear short n sweet reply. u r right I need to live in the moment n live peacefully n happily. lets see how it goes. Buddhist videos r peaceful.

  87. Josh
    November 16, 2016 @ 9:14 pm

    confused about what type of meditation I should start with?

    Reply

  88. prasad
    December 9, 2016 @ 9:46 am

    Dear Mindah,

    is the middle way and the noble eightfold path one and the same?

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      December 12, 2016 @ 9:49 am

      According to this sutta it is:

      “Monks, these two extremes ought not to be practiced by one who has gone forth from the household life. (What are the two?) There is addiction to indulgence of sense-pleasures, which is low, coarse, the way of ordinary people, unworthy, and unprofitable; and there is addiction to self-mortification, which is painful, unworthy, and unprofitable.

      “Avoiding both these extremes, the Tathagata (The Perfect One)[1] has realized the Middle Path; it gives vision, gives knowledge, and leads to calm, to insight, to enlightenment and to Nibbana. And what is that Middle Path realized by the Tathagata…? It is the Noble Eightfold path, and nothing else, namely: right understanding, right thought, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness and right concentration. This is the Middle Path realized by the Tathagata which gives vision, which gives knowledge, and leads to calm, to insight, to enlightenment, and to Nibbana.

      http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sn/sn56/sn56.011.piya.html

      Basically one practices the 8 trainings without overindulgence to the mundane world and not being so strict on ourselves that we harm our bodies. Our body needs to be healthy and strong to be a fit vehicle for meditation.

      Reply

      • prasad
        December 12, 2016 @ 11:12 am

        thanx for the detailed reply. even I thought that both are same but now it is confirmed.

        Reply

  89. prasad
    December 9, 2016 @ 11:14 am

    dear mindah,

    I want to share a story with you and also expect your answer to a question in it.

    Back in the year 2001 I was working in the US in NY right in the first of the two twin towers that were hit by the terrorists planes. The first tower was hit by the plane at 8.46 am and I used to be in that tower daily for work around the same time. However on that particular day or September 11 when I woke up in the morning to get ready for going to work I felt as if I had a severe attack of flu and had high fever and a runny nose,although till the previous night I was absolutely fine, so I told my mom that I m not going to work and slept again. Then after about half an hour I woke back up again and realised that my fever had gone and my nose was normal and I was perfectly fine n dandy so I told my mom that I am going for work again. But this half hour was crucial because I missed the daily bus that I rode to office. so I caught a later bus and while I was on the way the attacks happened and I was saved.
    All my near and dear ones say that I was saved by divine intervention and the blessings of my mom n dad paid off. I also lean towards accepting that god,if there is a god, saved me.
    My question to you is what do you think and do u think that some divine intervention saved me, in the light of Buddhism. also how did I get flu n runny nose when I was fine the previous night and how did the flu n runny nose disappear in 30 mins that morning, has never happened to me before that day n never happened after that day?
    I am very deeply interested to know your thoughts, thank you.

    regards,
    prasad

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      December 12, 2016 @ 9:44 am

      Sure, I believe in divine intervention, but it doesn’t have to come from a God who is the creator of all. There are said to be many disembodied spirits that can help us in some ways when our karma allows it. I would say that it would make sense to treat the rest of your life as a gift. 🙂

      Reply

      • prasad
        December 12, 2016 @ 11:11 am

        thanx for the reply. I am glad that u accept that there was some divine intervention. I agree that I should treat the rest of my life as a gift,it indeed is a gift.
        disembodied spirits, what are those? can you explain and give examples of the same?

        Reply

        • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
          December 14, 2016 @ 8:16 am

          Disembodied just means they don’t have a physical tangible body. Spirits come in numerous forms so it would be impossible to list them all. But in Buddhism, specifically Mahayana Buddhism, there is more open talk about spiritual beings that will try to help others (they are often called bodhisattvas).

          Reply

  90. Jason Lucarelli
    December 15, 2016 @ 3:52 am

    Dear Mindah,

    I am struggling to form my spiritual identity. I was raised Catholic, but have become more and more disenchanted and not able to identify with the Christian faith; and as an openly gay man, and advocate for the LGBTQ community I struggled to feel motivated to keep my association with my church. During my clinical training in addiction medicine, I became more and more acclimated with mindfulness based techniques to psychotherapy and serendipitously was introduced to the tenets of Buddhism and was very much drawn to them. However, I did not believe there was any condemnations against the LGBTQ community until I did my own research. What advice can you give to prevent me from not being turned away or is there any at all?

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      December 16, 2016 @ 5:13 am

      Hi Jason,
      Do you mean you have seen condemnation of against the LGBTQ community in Buddhism as well?
      In Buddhism, sexual orientation is less important than how much energy you’re expending on activities of a sexual nature. Buddhism is about purifying one’s mind of the defilements of greed, hatred, jealousy, not to mention lust. There’s no peace in one’s mind when it’s full of lust.
      Then ultimately the goal in Buddhism is to be awakened to recognize that the (ego) self is merely a construct. So whatever labels we give ourselves need to be eventually let go of.

      Reply

      • Jason Lucarelli
        December 16, 2016 @ 2:11 pm

        I have seen condemnation stating that any type of homosexual act is against the tenets of Buddhism (e.g. sexual misconduct) since it is not in the intention of procreation which is unfortunately exactly one of the main reasons that I left Christianity. I’ve even read the Dalai Llama state this. I am in a committed monogamous relationship and as a mental health practitioner I am very versed in the scientific literature which supports overwhelmingly that sexual orientation whether straight or gay/lesbian/bisexual (or any sexual minority) as an inherent, rigged, inborn quality. I just really was “enthusiastic” about embracing the Dharma because I felt I had sanctuary as long as I was not engaging in sexual misconduct (i.e. infidelity, promiscuity, unsafe sexual practices).

        Reply

        • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
          December 17, 2016 @ 5:28 am

          I understand your concern. As far as I know it isn’t written in the Pali suttas that homosexuality equates to sexual misconduct, although there are varying opinions across different traditions and schools. But what I have seen is the vast majority of Buddhist teachers and organizations warmly welcome gay people as disciples and there isn’t any criticism or abuse towards them. While we might need to say “according to some old texts it says this and this”, we also need to agree that the times are different and modern attitudes have changed. The Dharma is ever-evolving. While the truths to be realized remain the same, the way it is taught is changing. I think it makes sense to take the practical approach of never getting bogged in theory, but actually practicing and seeing what wisdom brings.

          I’m sure you’re not the first gay person to tackle this issue. I found two gay Buddhist forums online: http://www.gaybuddhistsangha.org/ and http://gaybuddhist.org/v3-wp/. Perhaps the people in there can share how they’ve reconciled this issue in their own life and practice.

          Reply

  91. rajib sharma
    December 16, 2016 @ 5:19 pm

    dear mindah madam,
    i seek your help on how i can overcome my sexual desires . Is it possible to completely control your mind from lust and things that are attractive. And , also i find very difficult to keep moving in life , i feel i got stuck.

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      December 19, 2016 @ 4:32 am

      The usual antidote for lust is to meditate on the unpleasantness of the human body. Our bodies are made up of many unattractive things. When you recognize this it can balance out the tendency to over-exaggerate the beauty of one’s body.

      Reply

      • rajib sharma
        December 23, 2016 @ 1:23 pm

        thank you madam for your reply.
        madam,
        this desires and thoughts i had made up since my childhood as a fact i never tried to express this feelings to anybody . with time i found myself lost in thought unable to live fully in the present moment . I had never had come close to women and this is not the right time for me to involved as it is very important time of my career.
        let me tell you my present scenario , i know what is right for me at the moment but i always thinking in my mind but unable to do it practically . living in the fantasy world made by me, which was previously was only for the desires i had but now it become my every single activity.
        the year 2017 is very important for me as per my career is concern and at the present time i want to study but unable to concentrate and focus . i think of studying very hard but could not done it practically .. please help me madam what should i do immediately..

        Reply

        • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
          December 24, 2016 @ 9:06 am

          I’m not sure if you have a daily meditation practice. If not, you should start one. Practicing meditation not only improves our ability to focus, but it can subdue unwholesome thoughts and give us more control of our mind in general.

          Reply

          • rajib sharma
            December 25, 2016 @ 6:05 am

            Okay ,I will start a daily session of meditation.I am new to meditation.Can u suggest how should i start. Madam, I have been practicing your mindfulness breathing exercise for 10 mins taking help from your video.Is it enough for starting.
            Please suggest.

          • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
            December 26, 2016 @ 12:58 pm

            Yes, 10 minutes is a good start. But if you really want to experience the benefits you will need to increase that to 20-30 minutes daily. Then you will develop the mindfulness that gives you more awareness and control of your mind and its negative states.

  92. prasad
    December 18, 2016 @ 1:37 pm

    hi mindah,

    Buddhism primarily focuses on suffering and means to eliminate suffering. Buddha did not dwell on metaphysical questions. However he put forth the concept of anatta or no soul as well as rebirth. How did he reach such conclusions when they were of no interest to him and what made him arrive at these conclusions?

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      December 19, 2016 @ 4:29 am

      Prasad, you’re right he didn’t dwell on metaphysical questions. He realized the truth of rebirth, karma and anatta through his awakening.

      Read this sutta here: http://www.accesstoinsight.org/ptf/buddha.html#awakening (the awakening and Supreme awakening parts)

      Specifically at the end of his awakening he realized that the ego-self is driven by craving driven by ignorance (an erroneous belief in self).

      Reply

      • prasad
        December 19, 2016 @ 9:09 am

        hi mindah,

        this awakening of the Buddha might have been some super-duper process. I mean this deep meditation is really something. also doesn’t it also imply that in a sense all the knowledge is inward and in a sense we are all born with it, we just have to dig deep, whereas the scientific world is looking for answers in the outside.

        Reply

  93. Jason Lucarelli
    December 18, 2016 @ 5:04 pm

    Thank you so much. Your videos and blog has been very helpful. And I ordered Brian Weiss’ book that you talked about. I will let you know my progress as I move forward embracing the Dharma.

    Reply

  94. prasad
    December 21, 2016 @ 7:41 am

    hi mindah,

    I just can’t accept that this world has no god, and by that I mean the ‘GOD’. there has to be some master that governs our existence. and by this god I don’t mean the devas, brahmas that you have talked about. What are your views?

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      December 22, 2016 @ 5:02 am

      I think I mentioned before that I follow the Buddhist idea that no God as a creator exists, but that the world came into being through the karmic force of beings; it follows some kind of cycle of expansion and contraction. I personally don’t feel the need to believe in one God as a creator. But there are obviously many people who prefer this view (hence all the other major religions). There’s nothing wrong with having that view. Just practice morality and meditation and you’ll lead a happy, virtuous life, which is all we can ask of anyone. If you feel so strongly about there being a God, then embrace that and let that guide you on a path of virtue. 🙂

      Reply

      • prasad
        December 22, 2016 @ 5:59 am

        mindah,

        even I think u mentioned ur view before. the very idea that there is no creator god is scary. bcoz then we are on our own. so who takes care of us. then what happens after death and how is the afterlife. some people say that we will be judged after death and that we will either go to heaven or hell depending on that. I know Buddhism differs in regards of this issues. of course leading a life of virtue is common to all religious practices and that is what we should follow. it takes courage to follow the Buddhist path and I prolly lack it.

        Reply

        • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
          December 24, 2016 @ 9:12 am

          Even a god cannot save us unless we’ve created the necessary karma. We still need to do the work ourselves.
          I wouldn’t necessarily say it’s about courage… more about interpretation and what ‘feels’ right according to our understanding of the world now. Everyone sees things differently and that’s alright.

          Reply

          • prasad
            December 24, 2016 @ 1:47 pm

            mindah,

            very good comment.
            but I disagree with a few points. its about the metaphysical.
            Buddha puts forth anatta or the no soul theory whereas the most common view is there is soul. We are beginners on the Buddhist path so how our interpretation and what feels right can assure us that anatta is right bcoz we are not there as yet and we have no way to know either anatta or soul is right. all that we are left with is just accept what is being taught. Buddha was great and that’s why we are discussing him. Many learned scholars and saints from different parts of the world who graced this world after the Buddha aligned with the soul theory. Existence of soul is almost intrinsic in even a very lay persons mindset, that’s why we hear expressions such as this ripped my soul apart and the famous well-being slogan body-mind-soul. If there’s no soul then are we just consciousness and after nirvana we transform into unrestricted awareness.
            Ofcourse as you say we must not get lost in the metaphysics but somehow u cant keep it away the question does pop-up. having said that we agree leading a life of virtue and accruing good karma is what we need to do.
            Thanks.
            Merry Xmas and May God bless you. You surely have resolved a lot of my queries and have given peace to my mind and Buddhist teachings are so peaceful such as non-violence and this world needs to learn them.

  95. Thomas
    December 22, 2016 @ 1:33 pm

    Hi,
    I really like your videos. Good explanations and a very nice voice too.
    Could you do maybe a video about mantras – especially the OM MANI PADME HUM ?

    Thomas

    Reply

    • Mindah-Lee Kumar Mindah-Lee Kumar
      December 24, 2016 @ 9:09 am

      Thanks Thomas. I’ve got this video on my To-Do list, but there are many other videos I want to make before this one. So if you can’t wait, I suggest having a read of what’s on the internet. I remember seeing a detailed teaching on this mantra by the Dalai Lama. 🙂

      Reply

  96. Joe Reddish
    December 28, 2016 @ 12:02 am

    Mindah, thank you for your response to my email today. Being relatively new to following/learning the Buddhist teachings, especially when taking into consideration of the various sects and sub-sects (so to speak) and not really having good footing or a teacher for guidance to help set me on a coherent path has me wondering all the time if this a viable way to establish myself on this path, let alone progress. I’m not even confident if I am meditating correctly. Although, in a town not too far from me there is a Buddhist temple of a Thai Theravada tradition, that offers meditation instruction on Saturday afternoons. Plan on visiting there this Saturday. Other than that I need to absorb what I can from your videos and asking questions from time to time on your blogs along with learning from other online resources. Going to keep plugging away not matter what. Wish you my best.

    Reply

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