What is Karma? Definition of the Law of Cause and Effect in Buddhism

 
Karma is a complex and often misunderstood concept in Buddhism. Karma means ‘action’ as well as the law of cause and effect. In this video I explain what karma is and how we can use it to empower ourselves and our lives so that we will only meet with favorable conditions and happiness, now and in the future. Karma also explains how we have become the person we are today and how we can transform our present-day difficulties into causes for future happiness and even enlightenment.

To watch my video on rebirth & past life evidence, click here.

As I mentioned in the video, there are five processes influencing our lives. These five are called the Five Niyamas. Among them, they include the processes of climate and weather, and the nature of germs and seeds. You can read more about the four other factors influencing our lives here and here.
 
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©2005 Access to Insight. The text of this page (“Intentional action: kamma (Skt: karma)”, by Access to Insight) is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. To view a copy of the license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/. Documents linked from this page may be subject to other restrictions. Last revised for Access to Insight on 5 November 2013. How to cite this document (a suggested style): “Intentional action: kamma (Skt: karma)”, edited by Access to Insight. Access to Insight (Legacy Edition), 5 November 2013,http://www.accesstoinsight.org/ptf/dhamma/sacca/sacca4/samma-ditthi/kamma.html.

©2000 Metta Forest Monastery. The text of this page (“Kamma: A Study Guide”, by Metta Forest Monastery) is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. To view a copy of the license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/. Documents linked from this page may be subject to other restrictions. Transcribed from a file provided by the author. Last revised for Access to Insight on 30 November 2013. How to cite this document (a suggested style): “Kamma: A Study Guide”, by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.Access to Insight (Legacy Edition), 30 November 2013,http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/study/kamma.html.

©1985 Buddhist Publication Society. You may copy, reformat, reprint, republish, and redistribute this work in any medium whatsoever, provided that: (1) you only make such copies, etc. available free of charge and, in the case of reprinting, only in quantities of no more than 50 copies; (2) you clearly indicate that any derivatives of this work (including translations) are derived from this source document; and (3) you include the full text of this license in any copies or derivatives of this work. Otherwise, all rights reserved. Documents linked from this page may be subject to other restrictions. From The Dhammapada: The Buddha’s Path of Wisdom, translated from the Pali by Acharya Buddharakkhita, with an Introduction by Bhikkhu Bodhi (Kandy: Buddhist Publication Society, 1985). Transcribed from the print edition in 1996 by a volunteer under the auspices of the DharmaNet Transcription Project, with the kind permission of the BPS. Last revised for Access to Insight on 30 November 2013. How to cite this document (a suggested style): “Pupphavagga: Flowers” (Dhp IV), translated from the Pali by Acharya Buddharakkhita. Access to Insight (Legacy Edition), 30 November 2013,http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/kn/dhp/dhp.04.budd.html.
 
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